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I need a solution to properly stop the thread in java.

I have IndexProcessorclass which implements the Runnable interface:

public class IndexProcessor implements Runnable {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(IndexProcessor.class);

    @Override
    public void run() {
        boolean run = true;
        while (run) {
            try {
                LOGGER.debug("Sleeping...");
                Thread.sleep((long) 15000);

                LOGGER.debug("Processing");
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                LOGGER.error("Exception", e);
                run = false;
            }
        }

    }
}

And I have ServletContextListener class which starts and stops the thread:

public class SearchEngineContextListener implements ServletContextListener {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(SearchEngineContextListener.class);

    private Thread thread = null;

    @Override
    public void contextInitialized(ServletContextEvent event) {
        thread = new Thread(new IndexProcessor());
        LOGGER.debug("Starting thread: " + thread);
        thread.start();
        LOGGER.debug("Background process successfully started.");
    }

    @Override
    public void contextDestroyed(ServletContextEvent event) {
        LOGGER.debug("Stopping thread: " + thread);
        if (thread != null) {
            thread.interrupt();
            LOGGER.debug("Thread successfully stopped.");
        }
    }
}

But when I shutdown tomcat, I get the exception in my IndexProcessor class:

2012-06-09 17:04:50,671 [Thread-3] ERROR  IndexProcessor Exception
java.lang.InterruptedException: sleep interrupted
    at java.lang.Thread.sleep(Native Method)
    at lt.ccl.searchengine.processor.IndexProcessor.run(IndexProcessor.java:22)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Unknown Source)

I am using JDK 1.6. So the question is; how can I stop the thread and not throw any exceptions?

P.S. I do not want to use .stop(); method because it is deprecated.

share|improve this question
    
Terminating a thread half way will always generate an exception. If it is normal behavior, then you can just catch and ignore the InterruptedException. This is what I think, but I also wonder how the standard way is. –  nhahtdh Jun 9 '12 at 14:18
    
How about using join()? –  Havelock Jun 9 '12 at 14:21
    
I have not been using threads very often so I am pretty new at threads, so I do not know if it is normal behavior to ignore the exception. That is why I am asking. –  Paulius Matulionis Jun 9 '12 at 14:23
    
In many cases it is normal behavior to ignore the exception and terminate the method processing. See my answer below for why this is bettern than a flag based approach. –  Matt Jun 9 '12 at 16:29
    
A neat explanation by B. Goetz regarding InterruptedException can be found at ibm.com/developerworks/library/j-jtp05236. –  Daniel Dec 30 '14 at 19:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 56 down vote accepted

In the IndexProcessor class you need a way of setting a flag which informs the thread that it will need to terminate, similar to the variable run that you have used just in the class scope.

When you wish to stop the thread, you set this flag and call join() on the thread and wait for it to finish.

Make sure that the flag is thread safe by using a volatile variable or by using getter and setter methods which are synchronised with the variable being used as the flag.

public class IndexProcessor implements Runnable {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(IndexProcessor.class);
    private volatile boolean running = true;

    public void terminate() {
        running = false;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        while (running) {
            try {
                LOGGER.debug("Sleeping...");
                Thread.sleep((long) 15000);

                LOGGER.debug("Processing");
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                LOGGER.error("Exception", e);
                running = false;
            }
        }

    }
}

Then in SearchEngineContextListener:

public class SearchEngineContextListener implements ServletContextListener {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(SearchEngineContextListener.class);

    private Thread thread = null;
    private IndexProcessor runnable = null;

    @Override
    public void contextInitialized(ServletContextEvent event) {
        runnable = new IndexProcessor();
        thread = new Thread(runnable);
        LOGGER.debug("Starting thread: " + thread);
        thread.start();
        LOGGER.debug("Background process successfully started.");
    }

    @Override
    public void contextDestroyed(ServletContextEvent event) {
        LOGGER.debug("Stopping thread: " + thread);
        if (thread != null) {
            runnable.terminate();
            thread.join();
            LOGGER.debug("Thread successfully stopped.");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I have done exactly the same as you gave the examples in your answer just before I have looked that you edited it. Great answer! Thank you, now everything works perfectly :) –  Paulius Matulionis Jun 9 '12 at 14:39
    
What if the thread logic is complex and invokes a lot of methods of other classes? It is not possible to check boolean flag everywhere. What to do then? –  Soteric Jun 9 '12 at 14:53
    
You would have to change the code design so that you build it in a way in which a signal to the Runnable will cause the thread to exit. Most uses do have this loop in the run method so there is not usually the problem. –  DrYap Jun 9 '12 at 14:57
    
Excellent solution, this is exactly what I was looking for. Is there a minimum amount of time that the Thread should sleep for? I'm assuming that the Thread.sleep() is definitely needed here? –  littleK Jan 31 '13 at 18:52
    
The sleep is just as an example to make the thread take some time. From what I gather from your question I think Thread.yield() is what you want, it stops the thread running continuously and gives some time back to the OS. –  DrYap Jan 31 '13 at 19:32

Using Thread.interrupt() is a perfectly acceptable way of doing this. In fact, it's probably preferrable to a flag as suggested above. The reason being that if you're in an interruptable blocking call (like Thread.sleep or using java.nio Channel operations), you'll actually be able to break out of those right away.

If you use a flag, you have to wait for the blocking operation to finish and then you can check your flag. In some cases you have to do this anyway, such as using standard InputStream/OutputStream which are not interruptable.

In that case, when a thread is interrupted, it will not interrupt the IO, however, you can easily do this routinely in your code (and you should do this at strategic points where you can safely stop and cleanup)

if (Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()) {
  // cleanup and stop execution
  // for example a break in a loop
}

Like I said, the main advantage to Thread.interrupt() is that you can immediately break out of interruptable calls, which you can't do with the flag approach.

share|improve this answer
7  
+1 - Thread.interupt() is definitely preferable to implementing the same thing using an ad-hoc flag. –  Stephen C Apr 6 '13 at 4:57
1  
I also think that this the perfect and efficient way to do so. +1 –  RoboAlex Apr 10 '13 at 15:27
4  
There's a small typo in the code, Thread.currentThread() doesn't have the parenthesis. –  Vlad V Dec 12 '13 at 0:13

You should always end threads by checking a flag in the run() loop (if any).

Your thread should look like this:

public class IndexProcessor implements Runnable {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(IndexProcessor.class);
    private volatile boolean execute;

    @Override
    public void run() {
        this.execute = true;
        while (this.execute) {
            try {
                LOGGER.debug("Sleeping...");
                Thread.sleep((long) 15000);

                LOGGER.debug("Processing");
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                LOGGER.error("Exception", e);
                this.execute = false;
            }
        }
    }

    public void stopExecuting() {
        this.execute = false;
    }
}

Then you can end the thread by calling thread.stopExecuting(). That way the thread is ended clean, but this takes up to 15 seconds (due to your sleep). You can still call thread.interrupt() if it's really urgent - but the prefered way should always be checking the flag.

To avoid waiting for 15 seconds, you can split up the sleep like this:

        ...
        try {
            LOGGER.debug("Sleeping...");
            for (int i = 0; (i < 150) && this.execute; i++) {
                Thread.sleep((long) 100);
            }

            LOGGER.debug("Processing");
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        ...
share|improve this answer
    
it's not a Thread -- it implements Runnable -- you can't call Thread methods on it unless you declare it in as a Thread in which case you can't call stopExecuting() –  mmcrae Dec 15 '14 at 20:07

For synchronizing threads I prefer using CountDownLatch which helps threads to wait until the process being performed complete. In this case, the worker class is set up with a CountDownLatch instance with a given count. A call to await method will block until the current count reaches zero due to invocations of the countDown method or the timeout set is reached. This approach allows interrupting a thread instantly without having to wait for the specified waiting time to elapse:

public class IndexProcessor implements Runnable {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(IndexProcessor.class);

    private final CountDownLatch countdownlatch;
    public IndexProcessor(CountDownLatch countdownlatch) {
        this.countdownlatch = countdownlatch;
    }


    public void run() {
        try {
            while (!countdownlatch.await(15000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)) {
                LOGGER.debug("Processing...");
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            LOGGER.error("Exception", e);
            run = false;
        }

    }
}

When you want to finish execution of the other thread, execute countDown on the CountDownLatch and join the thread to the main thread:

public class SearchEngineContextListener implements ServletContextListener {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(SearchEngineContextListener.class);

    private Thread thread = null;
    private IndexProcessor runnable = null;
    private CountDownLatch countdownLatch = null;

    @Override
    public void contextInitialized(ServletContextEvent event) {
        countdownLatch = new CountDownLatch(1);
        Thread thread = new Thread(new IndexProcessor(countdownLatch));
        LOGGER.debug("Starting thread: " + thread);
        thread.start();
        LOGGER.debug("Background process successfully started.");
    }

    @Override
    public void contextDestroyed(ServletContextEvent event) {
        LOGGER.debug("Stopping thread: " + thread);
        if (countdownLatch != null) 
        {
            countdownLatch.countDown();
        } 
        if (thread != null) {
            try {
                thread.join();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                LOGGER.error("Exception", e);
            }
            LOGGER.debug("Thread successfully stopped.");
        } 
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Simple answer: You can stop a thread INTERNALLY in one of two common ways:

  • The run method hits a return subroutine.
  • Run method finishes, and returns implicitly.

You can also stop threads EXTERNALLY:

  • Call system.exit (this kills your entire process)
  • Call the thread object's interrupt() method *
  • See if the thread has an implemented method that sounds like it would work (like kill() or stop())

*: The expectation is that this is supposed to stop a thread. However, what the thread actually does when this happens is entirely up to what the developer wrote when they created the thread implementation.

A common pattern you see with run method implementations is a while(boolean){}, where the boolean is typically something named isRunning, its a member variable of its thread class, its volatile, and typically accessable by other threads by a setter method of sorts (eg kill(){is runnable=false;}). These subroutines are nice because it allows the thread to release any resources it holds before it dies.

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