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Given this class, I"m not sure why I get the Ensure unproven Result != null warning.

public class MyClass {
  private readonly string _value;

  public MyClass(string value) {
    Contract.Requires(value != null);  
    _value = value;
  }

  public string Value {
    get {
      Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<string>() != null);
      return _value;
    }
  }
}

I can make the warning go away by adding an Invariant that _value != null, but it feels like I shouldn't have to. Is this just a limitation of the analysis?

EDIT: Adding a bit more to the question, as I think the point of my question is being missed.

public class Test {
    private string _value = "";

    public string Value {
        get {
            Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<string>() != null);
            return _value;
        }
        set {
            Contract.Requires<ArgumentNullException>(value != null);
            _value = value;
        }
    }
}

The CC analysis seems perfectly happy with this class; a non-null value is assigned in the ctor, and the setter Requires non-null values to change _value thus Ensures is proven.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your constructor does not promise that _value will be non-null. It sets _value to value, which is non-null, but that's an implementation detail, not part of the contract. Even if it were part of the contract, it wouldn't be enough, because all pre- and postconditions should remain equally valid when you add another constructor that doesn't make that same promise.

You should add the invariant that _value != null. Why does it feel like you shouldn't have to?

Edit: as an alternative, you could try adding an invariant that Value != null (which would also be useful outside of MyClass), and make Value's property getter ensure that Contract.Result<string>() == _value (merely to prove the invariant), but I'm not sure that would work.

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It feels like I shouldn't need to add the invariant because with the code as written there actually is no way for _value to be null. _value itself is an implementation detail that outside callers need not concern themselves with, so I don't understand why it would be part of the contract. –  Andy Jun 10 '12 at 17:27
    
@Andy Making _value != null part of the contract doesn't mean it becomes part of the public contract. It's a promise that your internal class methods must live up to and can rely on, it's a private contract. As I mentioned in my answer, you could add a second constructor which sets _value to null. That's perfectly valid, because you don't have any class invariants that _value must be non-null. If that's perfectly valid, then in your current situation, you cannot assume that it is non-null, even though it will always be so as long as you don't add that second constructor. –  hvd Jun 10 '12 at 18:02
    
I think you're missing the point of my question. Certainly adding a constructor that doesn't ensure _value cannot be null means we can't prove that Ensures will be met. But that's not the code in question. I'm trying to understand why the code I posted thinks Ensures cannot be proven, when logically it seems to me it can in fact be proven. Adding another ctor could break that I understand, but I see no reason Ensures should not be satifised with the code as is. –  Andy Jun 10 '12 at 19:29
1  
@Andy That's not how code contracts works. The code in your method should be provable without relying on the code in other methods: it should be provable by relying on other methods' contracts. –  hvd Jun 10 '12 at 19:30
    
I've added more to my question; maybe this will help you understand better what I'm asking. –  Andy Jun 10 '12 at 19:44

Not sure the option was available when the question was asked, but I ran into a similar issue today and found that by turning on the Code Contracts option "Infer Invariants for readonly" the warning went away.

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No, it was not an option when I asked the question m thanks for the info! –  Andy Mar 8 at 1:03

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