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I'm working in Firefox and relative paths are not working.

One caveat is that I stream my .css file using AJAX and add it to the DOM dynamically.

Another caveat is that my site is entered in one of two ways:

www.host.com (use this for production)

or

www.host.com/dev/ (use this for dev)

Images are either here:

www.host.com/host/images 

or

www.host.com/dev/host/images

depending upon how you enter the site.

I can post any information needed and test out a solution.

I was using

../images/name.jpg

but the browser somehow took this for:

hosts.com/images/name.jpg

which does not exist.

This is a question about relative paths and implementing correctly.

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4 Answers 4

Absolute Path URLs

Absolute paths are called that because they refer to the very specific location, including the domain name. The absolute path to a Web element is also often referred to as the URL. For example, the absolute path to this Web page is:

What is the correct way to specify relative paths in CSS?

You typically use the absolute path with the domain to point to Web elements that are on another domain than your own. For example, if I want to link to google it would be ...

If you're referring to a Web element that is on the same domain that you're on, you don't need to use the domain name in the path of your link. Simply leave off the domain, but be sure to include the first slash (/) after the domain name.

It is a good idea to use absolute paths, without the domain name, on most Web sites. This format insures that the link or image will be usable no matter where you place the page. This may seem like a silly reason to use longer links, but if you share code across multiple pages and directories on your site, using absolute paths will speed up your maintenance.

Relative Path URLS

Relative paths change depending upon what page the links are located on. There are several rules to creating a link using the relative path:

  • links in the same directory as the page have no path information listed filename
  • sub-directories are listed without any preceding slashes weekly/filename
  • links up one directory are listed as ../filename

How to determine the relative path:

  1. Determine the location of the page you are editing. This article is located in the/library/weekly folder on my site.
  2. Determine the location of the page or image you want to link to. The Beginner's Resource Center is located here: /library/beginning/
  3. Compare the locations and to decide how to point to it From this article, I would need to step up one directory (to/library) and then go back down to the beginning directory
  4. Write the link using the rules listed above: ...
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I think for streaming CSS via ajax all paths are relative to a "root" directory - www.host.com - it seems path information given is only relative to <link ... type CSS –  CS_2013 Jun 9 '12 at 17:07
    
I think for streaming CSS via ajax all paths are relative to a "root" directory - www.host.com - it seems path info only applies to <link> inserted CSS –  CS_2013 Jun 9 '12 at 17:13

Relative paths change depending upon what page the links are located on. There are several rules to creating a link using the relative path:

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I don't use <link> ...I stream in the .css text via ajax and add it to the DOM using appendChild()... –  CS_2013 Jun 9 '12 at 16:53

The relative paths are always relative to the CSS location, not the web page location that references the CSS file. So the question is, what is the location of the CSS file to start with? If you make all paths relative to it, it should work for both your production and development URLs.

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That is what I want relative to the file location....My CSS files are here /source/css.css and my images are here /images/name.jpg...so the correct path should be ../images/name.jpg...but this stopped working once I started using dynamic CSS...I believe dynamic CSS is a special case. –  CS_2013 Jun 9 '12 at 16:49
    
Why do you insert the CSS using AJAX instead of adding a <link> element dynamically that ponts to the CSS to be loaded? This would preserve the relative paths. –  Lucero Jun 10 '12 at 0:49

I need to test this out, but for dynamically inserted CSS all paths are relative to the root directory or www.host.com...where this resolves to...this is essentially saying all paths are actually absolute...this is the behavior I am seeing in FireFox.

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