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I'm currently learning Ruby, and I've come across a weird snag in the tutorial I'm using. I'm using this exercise from Learn Ruby The Hard Way, and it keeps producing a syntax error, and I can't figure out why.

The code I'm trying to use is

    puts <<-'HERE'
        There's something going on here.
        With the PARAGRAPH thing
        We'll be able to type as much as we like.
        Even 4 lines if we want, or 5, or 6.
    HERE

But, it always produces the following syntax error

ex9.rb:12: syntax error, unexpected tIDENTIFIER, expecting $end
We'll be able to type as much as we like.
     ^

Any help would be appreciated! I'm using TextWrangler, and TextWrangler parses it as a block quote, but Ruby is not.

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Works fine on my system (1.9.3) –  Stefan Jun 9 '12 at 17:12
1  
I don't see any errors. How you run the code? –  luis.parravicini Jun 9 '12 at 17:15
    
I just ran it on the command line! Just as ruby ex9.rb –  Anna Jun 9 '12 at 17:16
    
Probably an encoding problem. –  Andrew Marshall Jun 9 '12 at 17:24
    
Yeah it looks like it's a problem with how TextWrangler encodes it? Since it doesn't produce the same errors in irb. –  Anna Jun 9 '12 at 17:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Although it does not seem like it in the code snippet you posted, you probably did have a space on both or one side of the - in <<-'HERE'.

If you do, you will likely see warnings like this:

test.rb:1: warning: `<<' after local variable is interpreted as binary operator
test.rb:1: warning: even though it seems like here document
test.rb:4: syntax error, unexpected tIDENTIFIER, expecting $end
        We'll be able to type as much as we like.
             ^
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I tried added spaces and then deleting them again, but -w still produces that same error. I think CodeGnome is right that there's something in the encoding that's putting a space there? But I can't figure out how fix it. –  Anna Jun 9 '12 at 17:33
    
Edit the file in vi/vim/nano, ensure there are no spaces, then try running again. –  Zabba Jun 9 '12 at 17:34
    
And hopefully, you are editing the same file you are running - it can happen~ –  Zabba Jun 9 '12 at 17:37
    
tried it in vim, no dice. –  Anna Jun 9 '12 at 17:40
    
Try ruby -W2 ex9.rb - that might give you some more warnings? –  Zabba Jun 9 '12 at 17:42

It works for me with ruby-1.9.3-p194:

[1] pry(main)> puts <<-'HERE'
[1] pry(main)*         There's something going on here.
[1] pry(main)*         With the PARAGRAPH thing
[1] pry(main)*         We'll be able to type as much as we like.
[1] pry(main)*         Even 4 lines if we want, or 5, or 6.
[1] pry(main)*     HERE
        There's something going on here.
        With the PARAGRAPH thing
        We'll be able to type as much as we like.
        Even 4 lines if we want, or 5, or 6.
=> nil

I would suspect hidden characters or encoding issues. Check your locale, or try the --encoding flag when starting the interpreter.

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I tried typing the same code into irb and it worked just fine. I'll check to see if there's something wrong with how I copy-pasted it. Would the --encoding flag be used by typing 'ruby --encoding ex9.rb'? –  Anna Jun 9 '12 at 17:26
    
The flag expects an argument, such as ruby --encoding utf-8. You can also read ruby(1) or nuclearsquid.com/writings/ruby-1-9-encodings to see if this addresses your issue. –  CodeGnome Jun 9 '12 at 18:13
    
I already got the more specific answer, but I'll have to read up on it, thanks! –  Anna Jun 9 '12 at 18:15

I was having this problem, turns out the bottom file marker "HERE" in the above example was not against the left margin (in notebook anyway).

Any spaces in front it, or tabs and it refused point blank to work.

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