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While trying an outer join query I noticed that changing one condition from the where clause to the join clause changes the result. That surprised me but I simplified the tables and the query as below and now I think I understand but I would like to hear a solid explanation.

create table t0 (id int, b int);
create table t1 (id int, b int);
insert into t0 (id, b) values (1, 10), (2, 10);
insert into t1 (id, b) values (1, 2);

select t0.id, t0.b
from t0
left outer join t1 on 
    t0.id = t1.id
where
    t0.b = 10
    and
    t1.b = 2
;
 id | b  
----+----
  1 | 10
(1 row)

Now I move one of the conditions from the where to the join clause:

select t0.id, t0.b
from t0
left outer join t1 on 
    t0.id = t1.id
    and
    t1.b = 2
where 
    t0.b = 10
;
 id | b  
----+----
  1 | 10
  2 | 10
(2 rows)

Do you know how to write a straight reasoning?

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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The on condition of an outer join only determines if the join succeeds. If the join fails, the joined columns are filled with null.

On the other hand, a where clause filters entire rows out of the result set.

To make this more clear, addd t1.b to the result set. With t1.b = 2 as a where condition, you get:

t0.id   t0.b   t1.id   t1.b
1       10     1       2

versus t1.b = 2 as an on condition::

t0.id   t0.b   t1.id   t1.b
1       10     1       2
2       10     NULL    NULL

You can see why the where clause filters the second row out: null = 2 is not true.

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Or put the other way: a WHERE condition on the outer joined table turns the outer join into an inner join. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 9 '12 at 19:03
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