Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list of unigrams (single word), bigrams (two words), and trigrams (three words) I have pulled out of a bunch of documents. My goal is a statically analyses report and also a search I can use on these documents.

John Doe
Xeon 5668x
corporate tax rates
beach
tax plan
Porta San Giovanni

The ngrams are tagged by date and document. So for example, I can find relations between bigrams and when their phrases first appeared as well as relations between documents. I can also search for documents that contain these X number of un/bi/trigram phrases.

So my question is how to store them to optimize these searches.

The simplest approach is just a simple string column for each phrase and then I add relations to the document_ngram table each time I find that word/phrase in the document.

table document
{
    id
    text
    date
}

table ngram
{
    id
    ngram varchar(200);
}

table document_ngram
{
    id
    ngram_id
    document_id
    date
}

However, This means that if I want to search through trigrams for a single word I have to use string searching. For example, lets say I wanted all trigrams with the word "summer" in them.

So if I instead split the words up so that the only thing stored in ngram was a single word, then added three columns so that all 1, 2, & 3 word chains could fit inside document_ngram?

table document_ngram
{
    id
    word1_id NOT NULL
    word2_id DEFAULT NULL
    word3_id DEFAULT NULL
    document_id
    date
}

Is this the correct way to do it? Are their better ways? I am currently using PostgreSQL and MySQL but I believe this is a generic SQL question.

share|improve this question
    
The last version of "document_ngram" contains a repeating group. You'll need an extra table to avoid that. (the second version puts the repeating group inside a string, which is even worse) –  wildplasser Jun 9 '12 at 18:09
    
@wildplasser, what do you mean by a "repeating group"? –  Xeoncross Jun 9 '12 at 18:23
    
1NF: the word1_id, word2_id, word3_id are in essence an array. –  wildplasser Jun 9 '12 at 18:28
    
You may have better results with non-relational database - have you considered this option? –  Konstantin Pribluda Jun 13 '12 at 13:11
1  
This tutorial may be relevant, it uses MySQL and R: rpsychologist.com/… –  Ben Nov 28 '12 at 22:48
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted
+100

This is how I would model your data (note that 'the' is referenced twice) You could also add weights to the single words.

DROP SCHEMA ngram CASCADE;
CREATE SCHEMA ngram;

SET search_path='ngram';

CREATE table word
    ( word_id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY 
    , the_word varchar
    , constraint word_the_word UNIQUE (the_word)
    );  
CREATE table ngram
    ( ngram_id INTEGER  PRIMARY KEY 
    , n INTEGER NOT NULL -- arity
    , weight REAL -- payload
    );  

CREATE TABLE ngram_word
    ( ngram_id INTEGER NOT NULL REFERENCES ngram(ngram_id)
    , seq INTEGER NOT NULL
    , word_id INTEGER NOT NULL REFERENCES word(word_id)
    , PRIMARY KEY (ngram_id,seq)
    );  

INSERT INTO word(word_id,the_word) VALUES
(1, 'the') ,(2, 'man') ,(3, 'who') ,(4, 'sold') ,(5, 'world' );

INSERT INTO ngram(ngram_id, n, weight) VALUES
(101, 6, 1.0);

INSERT INTO ngram_word(ngram_id,seq,word_id) VALUES
( 101, 1, 1)
, ( 101, 2, 2)
, ( 101, 3, 3)
, ( 101, 4, 4)
, ( 101, 5, 1)
, ( 101, 6, 5)
    ;   

SELECT w.*
FROM ngram_word nw
JOIN word w ON w.word_id = nw.word_id
WHERE ngram_id = 101
ORDER BY seq;

RESULT:

 word_id | the_word 
---------+----------
       1 | the
       2 | man
       3 | who
       4 | sold
       1 | the
       5 | world
(6 rows)

Now, suppose you want to add a 4-gram to the existing (6-gram) data:

INSERT INTO word(word_id,the_word) VALUES
(6, 'is') ,(7, 'lost') ;

INSERT INTO ngram(ngram_id, n, weight) VALUES
(102, 4, 0.1);

INSERT INTO ngram_word(ngram_id,seq,word_id) VALUES
( 102, 1, 1)
, ( 102, 2, 2)
, ( 102, 3, 6)
, ( 102, 4, 7)
    ;   

SELECT w.*
FROM ngram_word nw
JOIN word w ON w.word_id = nw.word_id
WHERE ngram_id = 102
ORDER BY seq;

Additional result:

INSERT 0 2
INSERT 0 1
INSERT 0 4
 word_id | the_word 
---------+----------
       1 | the
       2 | man
       6 | is
       7 | lost
(4 rows)

BTW: adding a document-type object to this model will add two additional tables to this model: one for the document, and one for document*ngram. (or in another approach: for document*word) A recursive model would also be a possibility.

UPDATE: the above model will need an additional constraint, which will need triggers (or a rule+ an additional table) to be implemented. Pseudocode:

 ngram_word.seq >0 AND ngram_word.seq <= (select ngram.n FROM ngram ng WHERE ng.ngram_id = ngram_word.ngram_id)
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. This is the right way to store the words so they're not duplicated and easy to query with. –  Gerrat Jun 9 '12 at 18:46
    
Words are entities. Ngrams are entities. Documents are entities. The rest is relations between entities. –  wildplasser Jun 9 '12 at 18:48
    
I'm trying to work through this. What is the weight column on the ngram table for? Since I need to link ngrams to documents would I add a document_ngram table that included a date,ngram_word_id,document_id and modify the ngram_word table to also have a primary key? Also, the word_id & ngram_id would be a SERIAL in real life right? –  Xeoncross Jun 9 '12 at 19:36
    
The weight-columns is unused payload, but I used it to show how attributes for ngrams could be stored (in most cases: weights or frequencies). The documents table is just another layer in the hierachy: a document refers to words and / or ngrams. Documents could also carry some summary information (such as validity, importance, ...) –  wildplasser Jun 9 '12 at 19:51
    
And yes, word_id and ngram_id could be serials. (but they could also refer to a numbering which is imposed by another process outside your program / database) –  wildplasser Jun 9 '12 at 20:01
show 1 more comment

One idea would be to modify your original table layout a bit. Consider the ngram varchar(200) column to only contain 1 word of the ngram, add in a word_no (1, 2, or 3) column, and add in a grouping column, so that, for example the two records for the two words in a bigram are related (give them the same word_group). [In Oracle, I'd pull the word_group numbers from a Sequence - I think PostGres would have something similar)

table document
{
    id
    text
    date
}

table ngram
{
    id
    word_group
    word_no
    ngram varchar(200);
}

table document_ngram
{
    id
    ngram_id
    document_id
    date
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.