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I have this function:

int firstHeapArray (IntHeapArray h) {
    if(!emptyHeapArray(h))
        return h.array[0];
}

It's declared as int, and this is the IntHeapArray struct:

typedef struct intHeapArray {
    int *array;
    int size;
} IntHeapArray;

Can you say why I get this warning while compiling?

heap-test.c: In function ‘firstHeapArray’:
heap.h:31:1: warning: control reaches end of non-void function

Thank you very much.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The error message is stating that you have a method that is not a void return, but you're reaching the end without returning a value. You need to return a valid int value.

The problem is here:

int firstHeapArray (IntHeapArray h) {
    if(!emptyHeapArray(h))
        return h.array[0];

    // If emptyHeapArray(h) is true, you reach here...

   // You need to return SOMETHING here to remove the warning
   return 0;
}
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While its good practice, its not mandatory to return a value in either case. That's why the compiler reports a warning instead of an error. –  K-ballo Jun 9 '12 at 21:01
    
@K-ballo True - edited the comment to be more explicit about that. –  Reed Copsey Jun 9 '12 at 21:12
1  
Thank you very much. Now it's clear. But if it return a 0, the answer will be wrong. The function shall return the lowest value in the heap... and if the heap is empty, 0 isn't the lowest value. So... what to do? Keep the warning? –  Zagorax Jun 9 '12 at 21:14
    
@Zagorax This is where exceptions in C++ come into play. If hte heap is empty, and you call this, what do you want as an "answer"? Some people return a value known to never be valid (ie: a negative value, some "magic" number, etc), but that is problematic if there is no bad value. –  Reed Copsey Jun 9 '12 at 21:15
2  
@Zagorax You can also return a "success" flag, and pass the int in by pointer, setting the value when successful. –  Reed Copsey Jun 9 '12 at 21:19

If emptyHeapArray(h) returns true, you don't return anything. Then the control reaches the end of the non-void function firstHeapArray.

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The compiler deduces that when the if test fails there's no return statement if can execute.

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So there's no way to avoid this warning? I don't have any integer to return if the test fail. –  Zagorax Jun 9 '12 at 21:04

Indeed firstHeapArray does not return if emptyHeapArray(h) == true.

This is undefined behavior, which means anything can happen, most likely that anyone using this function when the heap is empty will potentially receive a random value.

You can handle this case returning a success flag:

bool firstHeapArray (IntHeapArray h, int * out_value) {
   if(!emptyHeapArray(h))
   {
       *value = h.array[0];
       return true; //success
   }
   return false;
}
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This function must return value in either case:

int firstHeapArray (IntHeapArray h) {
    if(!emptyHeapArray(h))
        return h.array[0];

    return 0;
}

In you example it returns value only if some condition is met.

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While its good practice, its not mandatory to return a value in either case. –  K-ballo Jun 9 '12 at 21:01
    
@K-ballo Not mandatory but introduces undefined behavior. From my point of view it is not acceptable. –  log0 Jun 9 '12 at 21:25
1  
@Ugo: It introduces undefined behavior only if someone attempts to read the result of the function... Anyway, from my point of view is still unacceptable. –  K-ballo Jun 9 '12 at 21:29
    
@K-ballo: imagine double mysin(double x) { if (x >= 0.0) return sin(x); } It is just plain nonsense to return bogus. And it is against the law, and the compiler warns you about it. –  wildplasser Jun 9 '12 at 21:53
1  
@wildplasser: While I concur its just plain nonsense, its not against the law. The standard allows to leave the body of a function without returning anything, and specifies that is only undefined behavior if you try to read the result of such function call. –  K-ballo Jun 9 '12 at 21:56

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