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I've got a DataGridView (DGV) that is not bound to a table in SQL Server CE. An 'Update DB' button on the WinForm then calls the following method PushFromDGV. This then clears the table HelloWorld and then runs through the items in the DGV inserting them into HelloWorld

There are approx 1000 rows in the DGV and it takes a couple of minutes to run.

Do I really have to do 1000 round trips to write the data to the db table or is there a way I can do it in one trip?

    private void PushFromDGV()
    {
        ExecCommand(@"DELETE FROM HELLOWORLD");    
        for (int i = 0; i < uxExperimentDGV.RowCount-1; ++i)
        { //iterate for every row in the DGV
            ExecCommand(@"INSERT INTO HELLOWORLD SELECT '" + (string)uxExperimentDGV[0, i].Value + "'");
        }
    }  
    public void ExecCommand(string myCommand)
    {
        // Open the connection
        try
        {
            using (SqlCeConnection conn = new SqlCeConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["DatabaseDGVexperiments.Properties.Settings.DatabaseDGVexperimentsConnStg"].ConnectionString)) // conn.Open();
            {// 1. Instantiate a new command with a query and connection
                conn.Open();
                SqlCeCommand cmd = new SqlCeCommand(myCommand, conn);
                cmd.CommandText = myCommand;  // 2. Set the CommandText property
                cmd.Connection = conn;  // 3. Set the Connection property
                cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();  // 4. Call ExecuteNonQuery to send command
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show((string)ex.Message);
            return;
        }
    }

It has been suggested to just make the open connection once before the loop and then close it after the loop. I now have the following.

Is this an accurate interpretation

?

    public SqlCeConnection conn = new SqlCeConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["DatabaseDGVexperiments.Properties.Settings.DatabaseDGVexperimentsConnStg"].ConnectionString);

    private void PushFromDGV()
    {
        conn.Open();
        ExecCommand(@"DELETE FROM HELLOWORLD"); 
        for (int i = 0; i < uxExperimentDGV.RowCount - 1; ++i)
        { //iterate for every row in the DGV
            ExecCommand(@"INSERT INTO HELLOWORLD SELECT '" + (string)uxExperimentDGV[0, i].Value + "'");
        }
        conn.Close();
    }   

    public void ExecCommand(string myCommand) 
    {
        try
        {
             SqlCeCommand cmd = new SqlCeCommand(myCommand, conn);
             cmd.CommandText = myCommand;  
             cmd.Connection = conn;  
             cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();  
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show((string)ex.Message);
            return;
        }
    }  
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Open your connection once, then execute all of your commands, and then close your database connection. This should save quite some time.

Moreover, you can try creating a transaction and running all commands as a part of the transaction. Depending on the database engine you're using, this may speed things further up.

P.S.: What is a DGV?

share|improve this answer
    
my guess is datagridview –  Filip Jun 9 '12 at 22:19
    
I thought of that, too, but then, it would seem quite unusual to use a DataGridView as a data storage and copy its contents into the database, so I wanted to know from the author him-/herself. –  O. R. Mapper Jun 9 '12 at 22:21
    
datagridview is correct –  whytheq Jun 9 '12 at 22:29
    
@O.R.Mapper "quite unusual" ... what alternative method would you suggest to capture a list of items provided by the user? –  whytheq Jun 9 '12 at 22:31
1  
Mostly, you'd store the data somewhere else and use the DataGridView only as a representation (possibly in virtual mode). The data storage itself would then serve as a link to the database, either implicitly (if it's managed by some object/relational mapper) or explicitly (i.e. you fetch your data from the data objects to write it into the DB). –  O. R. Mapper Jun 9 '12 at 22:37

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