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I have dynamic array filled with bytes, which are read from .raw file with BlockRead() and this operation, logically, requires hell of a Shell resources and I wanted to know if there is any methods to reserve some amount or limit maximum amount of Read/Write/Seek used for Program run time from Hard Disk Drive***

[Clarification]: I meant to set maximum reading speed from HDD while performing action with windows shell / internal app resources. In this moment app is very sensitive to hdd's performance, but it causes on several machines to freeze / lock because system cannot manage disk operations...

I wanted to know about any methods, tutorials, in worst case unit in which function declarations and class info can be found.

As much I know, Pascal as the base of Delphi does not provide very easy approach as the best could be TStream or TPipeline usage (TSocket should not be good, right?)... As much I have used streams, I did not like it because there were some underwater stones with TFileStream ...

Anyway - please give me at least intro to disk performance management...

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What are you asking, exactly? How is disk read associated with shell resources? –  gabr Jul 8 '09 at 7:19
    
What do you mean with "limit maximum amount of read used for program runtime from hdd"? –  Daniel Rikowski Jul 8 '09 at 7:23
    
I meant to set maximum reading speed from HDD while performing action with windows shell / internal app resources. In this moment app is very sensitive to hdd's performance, but it causes on several machines to freez / lock because system cannot manage disk operations... –  HX_unbanned Jul 8 '09 at 7:41
    
Besides - my native language is not english, so sorry if you need to clarify question. Sometimes I might write something a bit hard to understand. –  HX_unbanned Jul 8 '09 at 7:44
    
No problem. Perhaps you can edit your questions to integrate your clarifiction from the comments. –  Daniel Rikowski Jul 8 '09 at 7:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm afraid there's no way to throttle the IO activity using the Windows API or some Delphi function. (Unlike threads for example)

You can only slow down your IO accesses by adding Sleep commands or something similar into your code.

You could read the current IO activity using WMI and increase your delays if there's high IO activity.

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hm, nop, sleep is the thing that ( imho ) should be avoided as goto in programming whastover. Only possible solution is pretty platform-dependedt. Thats bad. I think I will be forced to go hard way - through WMI SnapIn accessing ... "delays", btw - You mean Seeking or moving through sectors in hdd? –  HX_unbanned Jul 8 '09 at 8:08
    
Yes, that's why I added "something" similar. –  Daniel Rikowski Jul 8 '09 at 8:18
    
hm, OK, I suppose I'll have to start browsing in MSDN resources and to read multithreading manuals ... too bad there almost everything is focused in C ( fourtinetly multithreading manuals is for Delphi, too ). –  HX_unbanned Jul 8 '09 at 8:34
    
Actually, Vista introduces I/O prioritisation, see technet.microsoft.com/en-gb/magazine/2007.02.vistakernel.aspx, the last section "I/O priority". But "several machines to freeze / lock because system cannot manage disk operations" sounds much more like a problem in the programming, which should be fixed first. –  mghie Jul 8 '09 at 18:39
    
@HX_unbanned: Your statement about sleep gave me something to think about and I added a SO question for that topic: stackoverflow.com/questions/1096794/is-sleep-evil –  Daniel Rikowski Jul 9 '09 at 12:56

RE: "I meant to set maximum reading speed from HDD..."

Just do the throttling yourself. Do disk access in the background thread and throttle operations according to whatever throughput you need.

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