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I have a simple signup input form (haml for brevity here:)

%form#signup
  %fieldset
    %input.email{type:'text'}
    %br
    .name
      %input.first-name{type:'text'}
      %input.last-name{type:'text'}

and css:

#signup { width: 350px; }
fieldset { width: 100%; }
.name { width: 100%; }
.first-name { width: 30%; }
.last-name { /* occupy remainder of 'name' line */ }

How to style this so that the .email field is the full width of the fieldset and the .last-name and/or .first-name fields expand to also fill the entire width of the fieldset and with the right edge aligned with the .email field?

Yes it might be easier to use a table here but is there a simple way with css? It need only work for css3 compliant browsers and degrade reasonably for IE8 and 9.

fiddle link: http://jsfiddle.net/3UP9H/1

share|improve this question
3  
Show your real HTML and, ideally, post a link to a JS Fiddle demo. –  David Thomas Jun 9 '12 at 22:53
    
ok, jsfiddle.net/3UP9H/1 notice that the .email field extends outside of the fieldset border (on chrome anyway.) the goal is to simply right-justify each line of the fieldset by expanding the input fields to full width. your solution? –  tribalvibes Jun 9 '12 at 23:16
    
Are you okay with absolute, rather than relative, units? Since you're explicitly identifying 350px for the form itself? –  David Thomas Jun 9 '12 at 23:49
    
the fieldset width is arbitrary but ideally the elements should use only relative measures so as not to hardcode the sizes throughout. –  tribalvibes Jun 10 '12 at 0:00

3 Answers 3

Original answer appears below the hr; the answer to the question, for clarity, appears to be a combination of box-sizing (and its vendor-previxed variants), in order to include the border-width and padding in the defined width of the elements(s) (rather than their width being defined-width + border-width + padding) and font-size: 0 for the parent element, which removes the errant space between the two input elements (although the space is, technically, still there; it just doesn't have any size to influence the position of the surrounding elements).

So, the CSS is that from the second example below:

fieldset input[type=text] {
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -ms-box-sizing: border-box;
    -o-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    width: 350px;
}

fieldset div input[type=text] {
    width: 105px;
    margin: 0;
}

fieldset div input[type=text] + input[type=text] {
    float: right;
    width: 245px;
}

div.name {
    font-size: 0;
}​

JS Fiddle demo.


Original answer follows:

One way seems to be:

form {
    width: 350px;
}

fieldset {
    width: 100%;
}

​fieldset input[type=text] {
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -ms-box-sizing: border-box;
    -o-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    display: inline-block;
    width: 350px;
}​​

fieldset div input[type=text] {
    width: 105px;
    margin: 0;
}

fieldset div input[type=text] + input[type=text] {
    float: right;
    width: 241px;
}​

JS Fiddle demo.

The use of box-sizing (and the vendor-prefixed variants) is to simply include the border of the element, and any assigned padding within the defined width of the element.

I've used self-closing input tags in the linked demo, since input elements, so far as I know, don't have closing tags </input>.

I've amended the above, slightly, to remove the issue of the errant space (between the sibling input elements in the .name element from requiring arbitrary corrections to allow them both on the same line (hence the strange width: 241px in the above CSS):

form {
    width: 350px;
}

fieldset {
    width: 100%;
}

fieldset input[type=text] {
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -ms-box-sizing: border-box;
    -o-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    display: inline-block;
    width: 350px;
}

fieldset div input[type=text] {
    width: 105px;
    margin: 0;
}

fieldset div input[type=text] + input[type=text] {
    float: right;
    width: 245px;
}

div.name {
    font-size: 0;
}​

JS Fiddle demo.


Edited to remove the fixed-width measurements, and replaced with relative, percentage, based units (as in the original question):

form {
    width: 350px;
}

fieldset {
    width: 100%;
}

fieldset input[type=text] {
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -ms-box-sizing: border-box;
    -o-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    display: inline-block;
    width: 100%;
}

fieldset div input[type=text] {
    width: 30%;
    margin: 0;
}

fieldset div input[type=text] + input[type=text] {
    float: right;
    width: 70%;
}

div.name {
    font-size: 0;
}​

JS Fiddle demo.

Unfortunately there's no way to set the width of the input elements to 100% by default, while still allowing sibling input elements to have differing widths. Or, there is, but it's substantially more awkward and requires you to explicitly identify both siblings as, although it's possible to select the second, or later, sibling with the + or ~ combinators it's not possible to select the first sibling based on its having subsequent siblings (without JavaScript, or other scripting language, whether client-, or server-, side).

share|improve this answer
    
interesting. i'll look at box-sizing. the inline-block is extraneous. –  tribalvibes Jun 10 '12 at 0:10
    
As to the inline-block: agreed. –  David Thomas Jun 10 '12 at 0:12
    
not concerned with the selectors generally, just the box-sizing to make the fields align. if you pare down your answer to just the second edit/demo i'll accept it. @saluce was on the right track with this too. thanks guys! –  tribalvibes Jun 10 '12 at 0:24
    
I've edited to clarify, but I prefer not to remove information from an answer (unless it's clearly wrong), on the off-chance that there might be something useful to someone else in the progression/development. –  David Thomas Jun 10 '12 at 0:39
    
too much extraneous to wade through. i'd prefer to see only the first paragraph and the last code sample. less is more. the one line answer is, use the css attribute box-sizing to rectify the input field rendering across browsers. –  tribalvibes Jun 11 '12 at 8:01
#signup { width: 350px; }
fieldset { width: 100%; border: 1px solid grey; padding:2px;}
.email { width: 99%;margin-bottom:2px; }
.name { width: 100%; }
.first-name { width: 30%; }
.last-name { width : 67% }

DEMO

Update

#signup { width: 350px; }
fieldset { width: 100%; border: 1px solid grey; padding:2px;}
.email { width: 99%;margin-bottom:2px; }
.name { width: 100%; }
.first-name { width: 30%; }
.last-name { width : 67%; float:right; }

DEMO

Firefox Screenshot.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
that doesn't work in FF. i'm looking for something principled, i.e. the css says 'expand these elements to be right justified' generally rather than something ad-hoc that just happens to work (or not) for the example. –  tribalvibes Jun 9 '12 at 23:28
    
Check the update, testeded in FF and chrome, thanks. –  The Alpha Jun 9 '12 at 23:32
    
nope. last-name field is skipped to another line. it's not about tweaking the percentages. it needs to line up exactly to the pixel, regardless of the width of the fieldset, font-size, border decoration, etc. (or at least for a given border decoration.) –  tribalvibes Jun 9 '12 at 23:41
    
I gave a screenshot of FF. –  The Alpha Jun 9 '12 at 23:48
    
twitpic.com/9uoz7g –  tribalvibes Jun 9 '12 at 23:57

Change these two lines to look like this:

.email { width: 99%; float: right; }
.last-name { width: 65%; float: right;}​

Fiddle Link

EDIT The odd thing is that about width in Chrome and IE is that there is an extra 4px width that isn't there in Firefox. The problem is that Chrome and IE add the border to the width of the box, while Firefox compensates the width of the internal textfield to make it fit the border within the bounds specified. See this version of the fiddle for a demonstration.

EDIT2 Check this updated fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
again, that's a kind of ad-hoc solution and now the left edge is not aligned. put the border: 1px solid grey back on the fieldset to see this. probably the solution is more involved than tweaking the percentages. also the first-name width is arbitrary, just for example. the question is simply right (and left) justify each line of input fields within the fieldset. any css experts ? –  tribalvibes Jun 9 '12 at 23:36
    
ok, this is close, jsfiddle.net/SapWq/2 but as you say now has the extra margin in ff. is there a way to do it without a special case for moz ? –  tribalvibes Jun 9 '12 at 23:49

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