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I have a function that I use on two different machine one a Mac running Python version 2.6 and the other is a Lenovo running version 3.2.The function writes data to a file and is called from with in a loop. When using Python 3.2 it works as expected and I get output such as below

25.0    25.0    25.0    0
25.0    25.0    75.0    0
25.0    25.0    125.0   0
25.0    25.0    175.0   0
25.0    25.0    225.0   0
25.0    75.0    25.0    0
25.0    75.0    75.0    0
25.0    75.0    125.0   0
25.0    75.0    175.0   0
25.0    75.0    225.0   0

When I run it on the machine running version 2.6 I get this

175.0   25.0    75.0    2
175.0   25.0    125.0   0
25.0    25.0    25.0    0   Should be first line
175.0   25.0    175.0   0
25.0    25.0    75.0    0   Should be second line
175.0   25.0    225.0   0   
25.0    25.0    125.0   1
175.0   75.0    25.0    0
25.0    25.0    175.0   1
175.0   75.0    75.0    2

Here is the code

def filesave(Xc,Yc,Zc,S): 
 Xc = str(Xc)
 Yc = str(Yc)
 Zc = str(Zc)
 Xs = str(S)
 #Ms = str(Ma)   
 w = open("Myout.txt.","a+")
 w.write(Xc)
 w.write('\t')
 w.write(Yc)
 w.write('\t')
 w.write(Zc)
 w.write('\t')
 w.write(Xs)
 w.write('\n')
 w.close()
 return()

Is there some difference between the two versions that is causing the difference? Thanks!

EDIT

Rest of Code

def cell_centers():
 read_file(F)
 dx = dy = dz= float(input('Please enter a value for dr:'))    #length of cell side 
 N  = int(input('Please enter a value for N:')) #N^3 Number of cells to be created
 Xc = zeros(N)       #array creation
 Yc = zeros(N)
 Zc = zeros(N)
 x1=0
 y1=0
 z1=0
 county = 0
 countz = 0

 for i in range(N):          #for loops to define cell centers
    Xc[i] = dx/2 +x1                  
    xmin = Xc[i]-dx/2
    xmax = Xc[i]+dx/2
    x1+=dx                   #increments x1 positions by dx
    for j in range(N):
      Yc[j] = dy/2 +y1
      ymin = Yc[j]-dy/2
      ymax = Yc[j]+dy/2
      county+=1
      if county==N:          #if else statement resets y1 to zero
        y1=0
        county=0
      else:
        y1+=dy
      for k in range(N):
         Zc[k] = dz/2 +z1
         countz+=1
         zmin = Zc[k]-dz/2
         zmax = Zc[k]+dz/2
         if countz==N:
          z1=0   
          countz=0
         else:
          z1+=dz
         counter(Xc[i],Yc[j],Zc[k],N,xmin,xmax,ymin,ymax,zmin,zmax,*read_file(F))

 return()        



def counter(Xc,Yc,Zc,N,xmin,xmax,ymin,ymax,zmin,zmax,Xa,Ya,Za):
 Cellcount = zeros(1)   
 S = (((xmin <= Xa) & (Xa <= xmax))& #count what is in specific range
     ((ymin <= Ya) & (Ya <= ymax))&
     ((zmin <= Za) & (Za <= zmax))).sum()

 for l in range(1):
   Cellcount[l]= S
 filesave(Xc,Yc,Zc,S)
 return()
share|improve this question
1  
Could you show the rest of the code, there has to be a loop calling filesave(), no? and various parameters? Or can you reproduce this problem with a single set of input? –  Levon Jun 9 '12 at 23:26
2  
Is the problem that the order of lines is wrong? In that case we really ought to see the enclosing loop. It would be helpful if you could clarify the question a bit more. I just called the function with 2.6.5 (Linux), 2.7.2 (Win 7) and 3.2.3 (Win 7) and got identical output, so I don't think write is the problem here, but rather the control structure used to call the function. –  Levon Jun 9 '12 at 23:35
    
@Levon I added the loop and the function that calls the filesave() –  Surfcast23 Jun 9 '12 at 23:39
    
@Levon yes the problem is that the order of the lines is wrong. –  Surfcast23 Jun 9 '12 at 23:41
1  
why don't you print the results to stdout instead of writing to a file and see what you'll get ? –  Amr Jun 10 '12 at 0:36
show 7 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I am going to go out on the limb and say the difference you are observing is due to the changed division between version 2.x and 3.x. (it looks like there's a lot of dividing going on, and I can't tell what type the numbers are, integer or float)

In 2.x you would get integer truncation when doing division with integers. This doesn't happen in v 3.x

Python 2

In [267]: 5 / 2
Out[267]: 2

Python 3:

In [1]: 5 / 2
Out[1]: 2.5

Your code does a lot of division.

If you still want to old integer division behavior, you can use // with Python 3:

Python 3:

In [2]: 5 // 2
Out[2]: 2

Changing the Division Operator explains this in detail.

What’s New In Python 3.0 goes over the big changes from v 2 to 3

If you want the new division behavior in Python 2.2+, you can use the from __future__ import division directive (Thanks @Jeff for reminding me).

Python 2:

In [1]: 5 / 2
Out[1]: 2

In [2]: from __future__ import division

In [3]: 5 / 2
Out[3]: 2.5

UPDATE:

Finally, please consider the potential problem of division as a cause (so perhaps the lines aren't out of order, but the results are different due to the division making it only appear that way). Is that possible? Also notice that the 4th column (the 3.x output) has all zeros .. that's not present in the 2.x output and further points toward possible problems with the computation of results -- so in fact the results are different and not out of order.

share|improve this answer
    
You beat me by moments. :-) –  Kirk Strauser Jun 9 '12 at 23:45
    
@KirkStrauser I got lucky (for once :-) –  Levon Jun 9 '12 at 23:46
    
Levon why would the change in the way 2.x and 3.x handle division affect the ordering of the output? I have also changed all of the dx/2 to dx/2.0 and still have the ordering problem –  Surfcast23 Jun 9 '12 at 23:58
1  
@Surfcast23 actually, I don't think the lines are getting output in different order. I think it's more likely results are being computed differently making it appear that the output is out of order. –  Levon Jun 10 '12 at 0:01
1  
Maybe mention that you can handle this with from __future__ import division? –  Jeff Tratner Jun 10 '12 at 1:36
show 6 more comments

Your filesave function is fine. I bet the difference in output is because Python 2 returns an integer from integer division expressions, while Python 3 returns a float:

Python 2

>>> 1/2
0
>>> 4/2
2

Python 3

>>> 1/2
0.5
>>> 4/2
2.0

This will give different mathematical results in your program and might account for the different ordering of the output.

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