Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can Enum contains other Enum elements plus its own elements ?

public enum CardSuit
{
    spades,
    hearts,
    diamonds,
    clubs 
}

public enum GameSuit
{
    spades,        //        These are 
    hearts,        //        the same
    diamonds,      //      " CardSuit "
    clubs,         //        elements

    suns    //             " GameSuit " special element
}

Can we include CardSuit in GameSuit without redundant retyping same elements ?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Sadly no, there's no good solution for what you want using enums. There are other options you can try, such as a series of public static readonly fields of a particular "enum-like" type:

public class CardSuit 
{
    public static readonly CardSuit Spades = new CardSuit();
    public static readonly CardSuit Hearts = new CardSuit();
    ...
}

public enum GameSuit : CardSuit 
{
    public static readonly GameSuit Suns = new GameSuit();
}

In practice, this can work mostly as well, albeit without switch statement support. Usage might be like:

var cardSuit = ...;
if (cardSuit == CardSuit.Spades || cardSuit == GameSuit.Suns) { ... }
share|improve this answer

What you have typed is legal but both enums are independent of each other.

GameSuit enum spades has no connection with CardsSuit enum spades.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 GameSuit enum spades has no connection with CardsSuit enum spades. –  Ahmed Ghoneim Jun 13 '12 at 11:05

You can carry values from one enumerated type to another explicitly:

public enum Foo { a, b, c }
public enum Bar { a = Foo.a, b = Foo.b, c = Foo.c + 3, d }
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work in practice. When Foo foo = Bar.d doesn't compile, what is the point? (not to mention that Foo.c + 3 is rather hideous) –  Kirk Woll Jun 10 '12 at 1:31
    
@KirkWoll - I wouldn't expect Bar.d to be assignable to an instance of Foo. –  HABO Jun 10 '12 at 1:37
    
Right, I know. So...if you can't exchange the "extending" enum with the original, what is the point? You're left with two enums that are similar but bear no syntactic relationship with one another. –  Kirk Woll Jun 10 '12 at 1:38
    
@KirkWoll - Begging your pardon. When the OP asked "Can we include CardSuit in GameSuit without redundant retyping same elements" I thought they wanted to create a new type. Unfortunately the following code does not throw an exception: public enum Foo { a, b, c } public enum Bar { a = Foo.a, b = Foo.b, c = Foo.c, d } Foo foo = Foo.b; Bar bar = (Bar)(int)foo; bar = Bar.d; foo = (Foo)(int)bar; –  HABO Jun 10 '12 at 1:57

Enum is a special class, with special behavior. You can't directly inherit this class, but it's inderectly inheriter any time you declare a new enum.

You cannot inherit one new enum from other enum.

The only way you can do something like that, would be using reflection. But you don't get what you want to do. This can so how far you can get using Refletcion with enums:

But I'm afraid this doesn't server your purpose.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.