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I'm playing with manual syscalls in assembly. I was able to make it launch properly before, but after removing the nulls I'm not able to get the syscall to execute /bin/date. Here is the code I wrote in AT&T syntax.

.global main
main:
    jmp     two

one:
    # zero rax and rdx
    xor     %rax,%rax 
    mov     %rax,%rdx

    # save string location
    mov     (%rsp),%rbx

    # push argv array onto the stack
    add     $16, %rsp
    push    %rax
    push    %rbx
    # assign argv pointer
    mov     %rsp,%rcx

    # execve call
    mov     $0xb, %al 
    int     $0x80

    # exit on failure
    xor     %rax,%rax
    xor     %rbx,%rbx
    movb    $0x1,%al
    int     $0x80

two:
    # get address of the string
    call    one
    .string "/bin/date"

If I'm right, %rbx should point directly to the string which names the program to launch. %rcx should point to a null-terminated array of pointers representing the program's argv, and %rdx would point to the environment, so I've left it null here. And, of course, %rax holds the syscall number (0x0b in this case).

(gdb) info registers 
rax            0xb  11
rbx            0x4000a0 4194464
rcx            0x7fffffffe968   140737488349544
rdx            0x0  0

(gdb) x/s $rbx
0x4000a0:    "/bin/date"

(gdb) x/s *$rcx
0x4000a0:    "/bin/date"

Despite this, the syscall doesn't execute the program, and returns -14, which translates to EFAULT (segfault). I'm not sure what I'm overlooking, any help would be appreciated.


So, a perceptive reader might have noticed that the above code is using 32bit syscall conventions (using %ebx, int $0x80 and friends) on a 64bit system. This was an error, as the 32bit convention is supported only to enable executing 32bit code. In code written for 64bit systems, syscalls use %rdi,%rsi, %rdx, %r10, %r8 and %r9 as well as the syscall instruction. Here is the corrected code for 64bit systems (nullfree):

.global main
main:
    jmp     two

one:
    # zero rax and rdx
    xor     %rax,%rax 
    mov     %rax,%rdx

    # save string location, note that %rdi is used instead of %rbx
    pop     %rdi

    # push argv array onto the stack
    add     $16, %rsp
    push    %rax
    push    %rdi
    # assign argv pointer, using %rsi instead of %rcx
    mov     %rsp,%rsi

    # execve call, note that the syscall number is different than in 32bit
    mov     $0x3b, %al 
    syscall

two:
    # get address of the string
    call    one
    .string "/bin/date"

However, the 32bit syscall convention is supported on 64bit systems (hence 32bit executables can be run), and I have also successfully execved other commands using the 32bit call convention on this system. In fact, a large majority of the "shellcode" I examined for x86_64 systems used the 32bit conventions. So, my question still stands: why didn't the 32bit calling conventions work in the above code?

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1 Answer

The execve() call has prototype

int execve(const char *filename,
           char *const argv[],
           char *const envp[]);

Note that NULL pointers are not usually passed, but if the envp[] array is to be empty, you should pass a pointer to a NULL which serves as the end of environment variables. Likewise, argv[] cannot be a NULL pointer. It must contain, at a minimum, argv[0] which is the program name. It is usually sufficient to place filename as the first element. To be perfectly conforming to what the shell does, strip the path and pass only the last component as argv[0] (date in your example).

The equivalent C code for your example is:

char *filename = "/bin/date";
char *argv [2] = {filename, NULL};
char *envp [1] = {NULL};

execve (filename, argv, envp);

Maybe I'm missing it, but it looks like you are doing the equivalent of (both 32 and 64 bit)

char *filename = "/bin/date";

execve (filename, NULL);   // note missing third parameter, and malformed argv[]

I don't understand your stack manipulation. It should be sufficient to push, push, push, syscall. I am confused why you directly manipulate the stack pointer.

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As far as I can tell, argv (or rcx in the 32bit code) points to an array of char* (note the gdb output after the code). I manipulate the stack pointer to keep from clobbering the /bin/date string (which is pointed to by rsp after the jmp/call trickery). I am almost certainly overlooking something though; I'll look over it more in the morning. –  bkconrad Jun 13 '12 at 6:21
    
@bkconrad: good enough. I am tired as well and will look more carefully at it in 9 hours. –  wallyk Jun 13 '12 at 6:23
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