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I have a large table with 9 columns and 12 million rows, like this:

col1  col2  col3  col4  col5  col6  col7  col8  col9
12.3  37.4  7771  -675  -23   23.8  78.8  -892  67.5
79.3  -6.3  6061  -555  -24   28.1  77.1  -889  32.6
55.6  -7.3  8888  -921  -56   78.3  22.3  -443  22.9
....  ....  ....  ....  ....  ....  ....  ....  ....

Currently the table is saved as TSV (tab-separated vector) format in my hard disk, 432MB in size. I want to populate the table into Redis in order to complete this kind of query most efficiently: Given a min value and a max value for each column, count the number of rows that are within the given range, i.e.

(min_col1 <= col1 <= max_col1) &&
(min_col2 <= col2 <= max_col2) &&
(min_col3 <= col3 <= max_col3) &&
(min_col4 <= col4 <= max_col4) &&
(min_col5 <= col5 <= max_col5) &&
(min_col6 <= col6 <= max_col6) &&
(min_col7 <= col7 <= max_col7) &&
(min_col8 <= col8 <= max_col8) &&
(min_col9 <= col9 <= max_col9)

So my questions are:

1) How to populate the table into Redis? What kind of key/value data structure should I use? Hashes, lists, sets, sorted sets, or what else?

2) After populating the table, given 9 min and max values for the 9 columns, how to write the query in order to get the count, i.e. number of rows falling within the 9 ranges? One way I can think of is, first find out the rows that satisfy (min_colX <= colX <= max_colX) for each X in 1 to 9, and then calculate their intersection. But I guess this is not the most efficient way. I just want to retrieve the count as fast as possible.

By the way, I have tried MongoDB. It is straightforward to populate the table using mongoimport, but it takes 10 seconds to complete my query, which is too slow and not acceptable for my real-time application. In contrast, Redis holds data in memory, so I hope Redis can shorten the query time to 1 second.

For your reference, this is what I did in MongoDB.

mongoimport -u my_username -p my_password -d my_db -c my_coll --type tsv --file my_table.tsv --headerline
use my_db
db.my_coll.ensureIndex({col1:1, col2:1, col3:1, col4:1, col5:1, col6:1, col7:1, col8:1, col9:1 }).
db.my_coll.count({ col1: {$gte: min_col1, $lte: max_col1), col2: {$gte: min_col2, $lte: max_col2}, col3: {$gte: min_col3, $lte: max_col3}, col4: {$gte: min_col4, $lte: max_col4}, col5: {$gte: min_col5, $lte: max_col5}, col6: {$gte: min_col6, $lte: max_col6}, col7: {$gte: min_col7, $lte: max_col7}, col8: {$gte: min_col8, $lte: max_col8}, col9: {$gte: min_col9, $lte: max_col9} }).

I used explain() to make sure the Btree index was actually used rather than a table scan.

I also tried creating a ram disk and saving the my MongoDB database into the ram disk, it shortened the query time from 10s to 9s, far from acceptable for my real-time application.

mkdir ~/ram
chmod -R 755 ~/ram
mount -t tmpfs none ~/ram -o size=8192m
mongod --dbpath ~/ram --noprealloc --smallfiles
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how did you run the MongoDB query? Did you create any indexes? It doesn't seem like too much data - it would all fit in memory with Mongo as well. –  Asya Kamsky Jun 10 '12 at 2:14
2  
by the way, you might considering accepting some answers to raise your "accept rate" –  Asya Kamsky Jun 10 '12 at 2:16
1  
With Redis, you have no table, no column, no query. Indexing things in multiple dimensions is not possible (not directly). To support efficient queries in n dimensions, you need a specific data structure like a kd-tree -en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kd-tree –  Didier Spezia Jun 10 '12 at 7:20
    
In MongoDB, this was what I did: 1) create index: db.coll.ensureIndex({col1:1, col2:1, col3:1, col4:1, col5:1, col6:1, col7:1, col8:1, col9:1 }). 2) do the query: db.coll.count({ col1: {$gte: min_col1, $lte: max_col1), col2: {$gte: min_col2, $lte: max_col2}, col3: {$gte: min_col3, $lte: max_col3}, col4: {$gte: min_col4, $lte: max_col4}, col5: {$gte: min_col5, $lte: max_col5}, col6: {$gte: min_col6, $lte: max_col6}, col7: {$gte: min_col7, $lte: max_col7}, col8: {$gte: min_col8, $lte: max_col8}, col9: {$gte: min_col9, $lte: max_col9} }). 3) Use explain() to inspect. The Btree index was used. –  Jacky Lee Jun 11 '12 at 0:20
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make each col a sorted set, then use ZRANGEBYSCORE on each key, and do the intersection and count in the application. I use phpredis and I do that a lot in memory, using array_intersect.

The perfomance problem is in ZADD, which you will use to create the sorted sets.

Once you have all the sorted sets created in Redis' memory, the rest is really fast.


Creating sorted sets (Redis sample)

ZADD col1 12.3 line1
ZADD col1 79.3 line2
ZADD col1 55.6 line3

ZADD col2 37.4 line1
ZADD col2 -6.3 line2
ZADD col2 -7.3 line3

PHP, finding ranges, intersection and count

$COL1 = $redis->zrangebyscore('col1', -10, 10);
$COL2 = $redis->zrangebyscore('col2', 2010, 2012);
$count = count(array_intersect($COL1, $COL2));

Hope that helps.

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There's (kinda) new player on NoSQL field: Tarantool

It has secondary indexes built-in and some support for range queries on them. Right now, AFAIK, it's only possible to make >= queries.

From the User Guide:

box.select_range(space_no, index_no, limit, key, ...)

Select a range of tuples, starting from offset specified by key. The key can be multipart. Limit selection with at most limit tuples. If no key is specified, start from the first key in the index.

Seems that it's a good tool for this job. It requires a little bit of extra work, though (write code to upper-bound those queries).

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