Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I used Underscore.js's _.filter to get an array of object ids like so:

var downstreamMeters = _.filter(that.collection.models, function(item) { return item.get("isdownstreammeter"); });

Now I want to set a certain attribute of each model in the array. I thought it would make sense to do this:

for (var i = 0; i < downstreamMeters.length; i++) {
    var sum = 0;
    inputMeters = downstreamMeters[i].get("inputmeters");
    for (var i = 0; i < inputMeters.length; i++) {
        var flow = parseFloat(that.collection.get(inputMeters[i]).get("adjustedflow"));
        sum += flow;
    }
    downstreamMeters[i].set({incrementalflow: sum});
}

However, I get the error:

Uncaught TypeError: Cannot call method 'set' of undefined

I checked the downstreamMeters array and it has the right objects in it. What do I need to do to set the attribute for each model in the array?

share|improve this question
    
Check if your downstreamMeters array has any element in it. –  sntran Jun 10 '12 at 3:23
1  
What you're showing works fine (jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/D4bT3). Is the "Some code..." changing i or downstreamMeters in any way? –  mu is too short Jun 10 '12 at 6:43
    
@muistooshort It appears that what I had as \\ Some code is causing problems. I updated the \\ Some code to what it actually is, which is a for loop. Is it a bad idea to put a for loop in another for loop? I'm new to JS and thought it would achieve what I wanted. –  chrishenn Jun 10 '12 at 19:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Saying for(var i = 0; ...) is somewhat misleading. JavaScript hoists all var declarations up to the top of the closest scope and for loop doesn't create its own scope. The result is that this:

for (var i = 0; i < downstreamMeters.length; i++) {
    var sum = 0;
    inputMeters = downstreamMeters[i].get("inputmeters");
    for (var i = 0; i < inputMeters.length; i++) {
        var flow = parseFloat(that.collection.get(inputMeters[i]).get("adjustedflow"));
        sum += flow;
    }
    downstreamMeters[i].set({incrementalflow: sum});
}

is the same as this:

var i, sum, flow;
for (i = 0; i < downstreamMeters.length; i++) {
    sum = 0;
    inputMeters = downstreamMeters[i].get("inputmeters");
    for (i = 0; i < inputMeters.length; i++) {
        flow = parseFloat(that.collection.get(inputMeters[i]).get("adjustedflow"));
        sum += flow;
    }
    downstreamMeters[i].set({incrementalflow: sum});
}

Now you can see that you are using exactly the same i in the outer and inner loops. On the first run through the loop, i will be inputMeters.length when you say downstreamMeters[i].set(...). Apparently, inputMeters.length > downstreamMeters.length so you end up running off the end of downstreamMeters; if you try to access an element of an array that is past the array's end, you get undefined and there's your

Cannot call method 'set' of undefined.

error.

Nesting loops is fine but you should be using different variables:

var i, j, sum, inputMeters;
for (i = 0; i < downstreamMeters.length; i++) {
    sum = 0;
    inputMeters = downstreamMeters[i].get("inputmeters");
    for (j = 0; j < inputMeters.length; j++)
        sum += parseFloat(that.collection.get(inputMeters[j]).get("adjustedflow"));
    downstreamMeters[i].set({incrementalflow: sum});
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works great, thanks a bunch! I did some debugging and inputMeters.length was indeed greater than downstreamMeters.length. –  chrishenn Jun 10 '12 at 20:06
    
@chrishenn: And if it wasn't, your outer loop would never finish. –  mu is too short Jun 10 '12 at 20:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.