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I have made a custom formwizard and incorporated it into my admin interface.

Basically I have taken the change_form.html and left it under the admin interface url:

    (r'^admin/compilation/evaluation/add/$', EvaluationWizard([EvaluationForm1, EvaluationForm2])),

It works, but the admin "session" is not kept. I can access the page without being logged in to the admin interface, and the admin variables like the breadcrumbs are not working.

How do I incorporate it under the "admin interface session" so to speak?

Thanks, John

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you need to make sure only authorised users access the page, you need to check for an admin user in your request handler. This will be the __call__ method in your EvaluationWizard class.

Basically, the logic used by the admin is available for viewing here. Look for this in the AdminSite class:

if not self.has_permission(request): 
    return self.login(request)

and use similar logic, or whatever you need. You'll need a similar statement at the top of your __call__ method. The has_permission method of AdminSite is a one-liner, which you can use as-is, but you'll need to adapt the login method to your specific needs.

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Thank you for your comment. I am not sure how to use your example, neither sure if this will help the template variables such as the breadcrumbs to work? Could you do a practical example of how to use the call method in a FormWizard class? If I just override the call method in the FormWizard and don't do anything but return its superclass, I get an error stating it is not returing a HttpResponse object. –  John Magistr Jul 8 '09 at 14:06
    
Do you really mean return the superclass? Or return what the superclass returns? You need to post the code to avoid misunderstandings. –  Vinay Sajip Jul 8 '09 at 14:10
    
I mean doing def __call__(self, request, *args, **kwargs): super(EvaluationWizard, self).__call__(request, *args, *kwargs) Was that how I was suppose to do it? –  John Magistr Jul 8 '09 at 14:50
    
No - return super(EvaluationWizard, self).__call__(request, *args, *kwargs) –  Vinay Sajip Jul 8 '09 at 14:54
    
Thank you for your help so far Vinay. It still does not work for me, since 'self' is a FormWizard object, and not an AdminSite object - so "self.has_permission" is not an option. Is it me who is still not understanding it? –  John Magistr Jul 9 '09 at 7:49

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