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So let's say I have a Clone object with these properties. Clone might have different mass or name based on the file it was loaded from, but these values never change at runtime. However, Clone instances to have some autonomy and properties which do change per instance, so they can't all be the same instance.

public class Clone
{
    public float Mass { get; protected set; }
    public string Name { get; protected set; }
    public Clone(string filePath)
    {
        Name = //read name from file
        Mass = //read mass from file
    }
}

Now, what I want to know is, what are the benefits and drawbacks (if any) of doing this instead:

public class CloneInfo
{
    public float Mass;
}
public static class Database
{
    public static Dictionary<string, CloneInfo> Lookup;
    [...load whole dictionary from files...]
}
public class Clone
{
    public string Name { get; protected set; }
    public float Mass { get { return Database.Lookup[Name].Mass; } }
    public Clone(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }
}

With this 'redirecting' method, I keep the simple syntax of Clone.Mass, but don't have to store a Mass value for each instance. Since I've got thousands of clones wandering about, this is a good thing. I'm mainly interested in 'redirecting' because of the syntax. I realize that I could simply manually do the database lookup every time I wanted a particular clone's mass, but I'd rather keep the usage of the class nice and straightforward. Is there any drawback to this? Is the property going to be slower than direct lookup in the static database? Does the property take up any space in a Clone instance?

Or, perhaps, is this a use case C# already has an answer for which I'm not aware of? Seems like write-once properties which are common among many instances might be somewhere in this beautiful language.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If all the clones of a certain type have the same mass, that sounds like a job for subclassing:

class Clone
{
    public abstract float Mass { get; }
}
class HeavyClone : Clone
{
    public override float Mass { get { return 12345.6; } }
}
class LightClone : Clone
{
    public override float Mass { get { return 1.23456; } }
}

More to the point of your question: if you are more constrained by memory than by processing time, your approach may give some benefit. If memory is plentiful, and cache performance is not an issue, the approach you suggest probably has little value. It certainly seems to complicate the code quite a bit.

The usual advice is: write simple code, measure the performance, and, if the performance is inadequate, address the performance bottlenecks. That way, you only have complicated code in places where it actually helps your application's performance.

Another thought: instead of having have the clone index into the dictionary with the Name string, why not just have a CloneInfo field:

public class CloneInfo  
{  
    public float Mass;  
}  
public class Clone  
{  
    private CloneInfo _info;  
    public float Mass { get { return _info.Mass; } }  
    public Clone(CloneInfo info)  
    {  
        _info = info;
    }  
}  
share|improve this answer
    
Memory is a very big issue for me at the moment, and I'm trying to restructure my code so that Clones take up less space. However, I think subclassing would lead to even messier code. We are talking about possibly hundreds of different types of Clones in the future of this game, each with the possibility of thousands of instances. –  A-Type Jun 10 '12 at 3:31
    
@A-Type hmm, I had another thought, which could save on both memory use and processor time. See the edited answer for details. –  phoog Jun 10 '12 at 3:51
    
Ooh, I like it! So, all instances of a particular clone reference the same CloneInfo object for their constant properties. That's just about perfect, especially since I decided today to use pooling. Some Clones actually have more properties than others, and I was going to subclass those, but since a reference to CloneInfo would be the same size for all Clone instances, yet contain different numbers of properties, it's perfect for pooled objects! Thanks for the idea, I'm marking you accepted for your thoughts and help. –  A-Type Jun 10 '12 at 17:56

Suppose that we have a lot of accesses to Mass property. If in each access you try to load the Mass value from database, it can be a very heavy duty for your application and here will be a bottleneck. If the Mass value can be cached in the object, you can easily load it for once and keep it for further usages.

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The Database is essentially a cache. It doesn't load from file every time properties are looked up, only at first load time. So I/O bottleneck should not be an issue, if that's what your talking about. I'm caching in a static class instead of instances. –  A-Type Jun 10 '12 at 3:32

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