Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Having a rather low level application, I came into a sitatuion where I needed to determine the address of a Haskell function. I was able to do that with FFI, that is C, but I would like to do it directly in Haskell.

Here is my current solution with FFI:

main.hs:

{-# LANGUAGE ForeignFunctionInterface #-}
module Main where

import Foreign
import Foreign.C.Types
import Text.Printf

foreign import ccall "getFuncAddr"
  getFuncAddr :: CULong

main :: IO ()
main = do
  printf "0x%016x\n" (fromIntegral getFuncAddr :: Word64)

foreign export ccall func :: IO ()
func :: IO ()
func = do
  printf "hello world\n"

ffi.c:

void func(void);

unsigned long getFuncAddr(void)
{
    return (unsigned long) func;
}

Makefile:

all: main
    ./$<
    objdump -D $< | grep '<func>'

main: main.hs ffi.c
    ghc --make -O2 $^ -o $@

as always, also available as a gist.

share|improve this question
    
Would probably help if you explain why you need the address; perhaps there's a better way? –  MathematicalOrchid Jun 10 '12 at 10:04
    
I'm generating code with harpy at runtime. From that generated code, I would like to jump to a haskell function (in that case, for allocating memory), therefore I need the address and provide it the call instruction. –  lewurm Jun 10 '12 at 10:13
1  
FWIW, it's not guaranteed that a pointer fits in an unsigned long on all platforms. You should either use void * instead, or, if you want to be really explicit probably use ptrdiff_t from stddef.h. –  dflemstr Jun 10 '12 at 14:40
1  
@dflemstr: Shouldn't that be intptr_t or uintptr_t? ptrdiff_t is for the difference of two pointers, which could be smaller than a full pointer on some odd architecture. –  Antal S-Z Jun 10 '12 at 17:52
1  
@AntalS-Z, yes, you're probably right. –  dflemstr Jun 10 '12 at 18:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try this:

{-# LANGUAGE ForeignFunctionInterface #-}
module Main where

import Foreign
import Foreign.C.Types
import Text.Printf

foreign import ccall "&func"
  funcaddr :: FunPtr (IO ())

main :: IO ()
main = do
  printf "0x%016x\n" (fromIntegral (ptrToIntPtr (castFunPtrToPtr funcaddr)) :: Int)

foreign export ccall func :: IO ()
func :: IO ()
func = do
  printf "hello world\n"

See this section of the Haskell 2010 report, and look for "Static Addresses."

share|improve this answer

I think the documentation for FunPtr has pretty much what you want. The short version is you use foreign import "wrapper", as follows:

foreign import ccall "wrapper"
  getFuncAddr :: IO () -> IO (FunPtr (IO ()))

and then if you're done with it later, use freeHaskellFunPtr.

share|improve this answer
    
that looks like the right direction, however I'm not able to obtain the address of func with it. The Addr# value of FunPtr doesn't match with the actual value of func (probably I'm doing something wrong). Could you provide a working example please? –  lewurm Jun 10 '12 at 11:54
    
Hmm, tricky. I'm not sure I can provide a working example without doing a fair bit more work :P did you try calling it anyway? I suspect the pointer you get is a pointer to a function which calls the function you actually want, perhaps to handle marshalling or whatever. –  Ben Millwood Jun 10 '12 at 12:38
    
well, I don't want to call it, I want the address. –  lewurm Jun 10 '12 at 16:58
1  
@lewurm: I meant, providing it to the call instruction, which is what you indicated you wanted to do in the other comments. If you have other requirements, then this technique probably won't work for you. –  Ben Millwood Jun 10 '12 at 16:59
    
oh, sorry :-( I didn't get that in the first place. You're actually right, this looks very promising, although I don't get it to work right now. Probably I'm doing something wrong; no time atm, I'll investigate it tomorrow. thanks! –  lewurm Jun 10 '12 at 17:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.