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I'm unable to follow the Moment.js documentation, and need some help with setting it up. I've referenced the moment.min.js file properly on my webpage like so:

<script src="/js/moment.min.js"></script>

Coming to the HTML part of my webpage, I have two different datetime's on the same page:

Published Date

<time class="pubdate" datetime="2012-06-09T12:32:10-04:00" pubdate>
    June 09, 2012
</time>

Last Modified Date

<time class="updated" itemprop="dateModified" datetime="2012-06-09T12:32:10-04:00">
    June 9, 2012 ~ 12:32
</time>

Important! The relative date parsing shouldn't go beyond "yesterday". As for everything beyond, the <time> tags should display the exact datetime's they would without the JavaScript -- i.e. Moment.js shouldn't touch or parse dates that are past "yesterday".

Now, to make the library do its job as aforementioned, I need to call a function after the library reference. So, the question is, what should the function be? (Using jQuery is fine, as I already reference the library on my webpage.)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Please specify your question. I'm assuming you want a relative date parsing and the maximum should be "yesterday".

I never used moment.js but as far as the docs say, it's pretty simple.

Use var now = moment(); as your current date. Then parse every time-Tag in your DOM with var time = moment($(e).attr('datetime'));

To check the difference use the diff() method:

if(now.diff(time, 'days') <= 1) {
    // getting the relative output
}

Use var ago = now.from(time) to get the relative output and replace the time in your DOM with your ago variable.

Update based on comment:

Okay, well untested, but that's the basic idea:

Updated the code.

var now = moment();

$('time').each(function(i, e) {
    var time = moment($(e).attr('datetime'));

    if(now.diff(time, 'days') <= 1) {
        $(e).html('<span>' + time.from(now) + '</span>');
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is, I don't know JavaScript. And yes, I meant to say that the maximum should be "yesterday" and everything past that shouldn't be parsed. –  its_me Jun 10 '12 at 11:06
    
updated the answer. –  Johannes Klauß Jun 10 '12 at 11:11
    
Would be great if I can get little more help. (1) It's outputting in 19 hours — can it be something like 19 hours ago?? (2) It replaces the whole thing, i.e. <time class="pubdate" datetime="2012-06-09T12:32:10-04:00" pubdate>June 09, 2012</time> is being replaced with for example, <span>in 19 hours</span>. Would it be possible to get to do something like this? <time class="pubdate" datetime="2012-06-09T12:32:10-04:00" pubdate>19 hours ago</time> — only replace the content inside <time> tag, i.e. replace June 09, 2012 with 19 hours ago and nothing else. –  its_me Jun 10 '12 at 11:41
    
I updated the code, but please: When you want to build stuff with javascript, then learn javascript. Your questions are very, very basic. You really should spend some time learning the language. –  Johannes Klauß Jun 10 '12 at 12:08
    
Johannes, you are right. Actually I am planning to start learning JavaScript in a few days. Thanks again, for your time. :) The code works beautifully. –  its_me Jun 10 '12 at 12:31

You can also use the moment().calendar() function, which will format for you dates close to today (up to a week from today):

$('time').each(function(i, e) {
  var time = moment($(e).attr('datetime'));

  $(e).html('<span>' + time.calendar() + '</span>');
});​

You can customize the format strings with this code:

moment.calendar = {
  lastDay : '[Yesterday at] LT',
  sameDay : '[Today at] LT',
  nextDay : '[Tomorrow at] LT',
  lastWeek : '[last] dddd [at] LT',
  nextWeek : 'dddd [at] LT',
  sameElse : 'L'
};

If you are not interested in formatting dates prior to yesterday, just change the formats of lastWeek and nextWeek to full date-time format (e.g. 'L').


UPDATE 2013-09-06 Apparently it has a new syntax that also enables you to localize it:

moment.lang('en', {
  calendar: {
    lastDay : '[Yesterday at] LT',
    sameDay : '[Today at] LT',
    nextDay : '[Tomorrow at] LT',
    lastWeek : '[last] dddd [at] LT',
    nextWeek : 'dddd [at] LT',
    sameElse : 'L'
  }
});
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Very helpful, thank you! –  its_me Nov 24 '12 at 16:40

Extending @its_me's implementation above, here's a version that

  • updates all elements with a given class
  • keeps them updated every minute (so '1 minute ago' becomes '2 minutes ago')
  • switches to a different format when +-1 day from now (e.g. Last Tuesday at 11:45 PM)

Here's a JSFiddle for you to play with.

Your HTML:

<time class="cw-relative-date" datetime="2014-06-09T12:32:10-00:00"></time>

The JS to include:

(function () {

// Define a function that updates all relative dates defined by <time class='cw-relative-date'>
var updateAllRelativeDates = function() {
        $('time').each(function (i, e) {
            if ($(e).attr("class") == 'cw-relative-date') {

                // Initialise momentjs
                var now = moment();
                moment.lang('en', {
                    calendar : {
                        lastDay : '[Yesterday at] LT',
                        sameDay : '[Today at] LT',
                        nextDay : '[Tomorrow at] LT',
                        lastWeek : '[Last] dddd [at] LT',
                        nextWeek : 'dddd [at] LT',
                        sameElse : 'D MMM YYYY [at] LT'
                    }
                });

                // Grab the datetime for the element and compare to now                    
                var time = moment($(e).attr('datetime'));
                var diff = now.diff(time, 'days');

                // If less than one day ago/away use relative, else use calendar display
                if (diff <= 1 && diff >= -1) {
                    $(e).html('<span>' + time.from(now) + '</span>');
                } else {
                    $(e).html('<span>' + time.calendar() + '</span>');
                }
            }
        });
    };

// Update all dates initially
updateAllRelativeDates();

// Register the timer to call it again every minute
setInterval(updateAllRelativeDates, 60000);

})();
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Thanks to @JohannesKlauß for the code. This is basically how I executed his answer and how I am referencing the code on my website.

<script src="/js/moment.min.js"></script>
<script src="/js/moment.executor.js"></script>

Where, moment.min.js is the Moment.js library, and moment.executor.js has this code (courtesy of Johannes):

jQuery(document).ready(function($){

    var now = moment();

    $('time').each(function(i, e) {
        var time = moment($(e).attr('datetime'));

        if(now.diff(time, 'days') <= 1) {
            $(e).html('<span>' + time.from(now) + '</span>');
        }
    });

});

PS: You can actually edit moment.min.js and add the aforementioned code right in it, at the end. This way, you will be saving one additional HTTP request. :P

share|improve this answer
    
The additional HTTP request is relatively insignificant but you could link to a CDN that hosts the library if your number of requests are limited for some reason. –  Alastair Nov 1 '13 at 14:57

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