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Say the current thread holds a lock, then the same thread calls

synchronize(lock)

again, will deadlock happen?

I vaguely remember that the lock is re-entrant for the same thread, what does that mean?

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closed as not a real question by Sean Owen, alf, Greg Kopff, Shahbaz, bmargulies Jun 10 '12 at 12:43

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3  
How about googling a little bit? –  Sergio Tulentsev Jun 10 '12 at 10:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

From documentation:

Thread cannot acquire a lock owned by another thread. But a thread can acquire a lock that it already owns. Allowing a thread to acquire the same lock more than once enables reentrant synchronization. This describes a situation where synchronized code, directly or indirectly, invokes a method that also contains synchronized code, and both sets of code use the same lock.

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You remember correctly, reentrant means that the same thread can obtain the same lock several times, e.g.:

private final Object lock = new Object();

public void foo() {
    synchronized(lock) {
        bar();
    }
}

public void bar() {
    synchronized(lock) {
        //...
    }
}

works as expected, as well as (here this is used as an implicit lock object):

public synchronized void foo() {
    bar();
}

public synchronized void bar() {
    //...
}

and no deadlocks occurs. Of course other threads can't access neither foo() nor bar() at the same time because the lock is already taken.

The bottom line: locks are take by threads, not by methods/blocks of code. And taking a lock already obtained by the same thread is a no-op.

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Every object has a lock and a key to protect its crucial data state, so does every Class has a lock and a key to protects its crucial static data state.

synchronized keyword on the atomic statements (either method or atomized statements)

will be like locking the object. When a thread access that method or atomic statement, it has to obtain the key for that object.

Once it obtains the key, 
its free to access this synchronized method/statement
or any other synchronized method/statement of that object.
Thats what reentrant is all about.

But no other thread will be able to access this object's synchornized blocks until current key holding thread, let go of the key.

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