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I have read dozens of posts about PROs and CONs of trying to mock \ fake EF in the business logic. I have not yet decided what to do - but one thing I know is - I have to separate the queries from the business logic. In this post I saw that Ladislav has answered that there are 2 good ways:

  1. Let them be where they are and use custom extension methods, query views, mapped database views or custom defining queries to define reusable parts.
  2. Expose every single query as method on some separate class. The method mustn't expose IQueryable and mustn't accept Expression as parameter = whole query logic must be wrapped in the method. But this will make your class covering related methods much like repository (the only one which can be mocked or faked). This implementation is close to implementation used with stored procedures.
  1. Which method do you think is better any why ?
  2. Are there ANY downsides to put the queries in their own place ? (maybe losing some functionality from EF or something like that)
  3. Do I have to encapsulate even the simplest queries like:

    using (MyDbContext entities = new MyDbContext)
    {
        User user = entities.Users.Find(userId);  // ENCAPSULATE THIS ?
    
        // Some BL Code here
    }
    
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

So I guess your main point is testability of your code, isn't it? In such case you should start by counting responsibilities of the method you want to test and than refactor your code using single responsibility pattern.

Your example code has at least three responsibilities:

  • Creating an object is a responsibility - context is an object. Moreover it is and object you don't want to use in your unit test so you must move its creation elsewhere.
  • Executing query is a responsibility. Moreover it is a responsibility you would like to avoid in your unit test.
  • Doing some business logic is a responsibility

To simplify testing you should refactor your code and divide those responsibilities to separate methods.

public class MyBLClass()
{
    public void MyBLMethod(int userId)
    {
        using (IMyContext entities = GetContext())
        {
            User user = GetUserFromDb(entities, userId);

            // Some BL Code here
        }
    }

    protected virtual IMyContext GetContext()
    {
        return new MyDbContext();
    }

    protected virtual User GetUserFromDb(IMyDbContext entities, int userId)
    {
        return entities.Users.Find(userId);
    }
}

Now unit testing business logic should be piece of cake because your unit test can inherit your class and fake context factory method and query execution method and become fully independent on EF.

// NUnit unit test
[TestFixture]
public class MyBLClassTest : MyBLClass
{
    private class FakeContext : IMyContext
    {
        // Create just empty implementation of context interface
    }

    private User _testUser;

    [Test]
    public void MyBLMethod_DoSomething() 
    {
        // Test setup
        int id = 10;
        _testUser = new User 
            { 
                Id = id, 
                // rest is your expected test data - that  is what faking is about
                // faked method returns simply data your test method expects
            };

        // Execution of method under test
        MyBLMethod(id);

        // Test validation
        // Assert something you expect to happen on _testUser instance 
        // inside MyBLMethod
    }

    protected override IMyContext GetContext()
    {
        return new FakeContext();
    }

    protected override User GetUserFromDb(IMyContext context, int userId)
    {
        return _testUser.Id == userId ? _testUser : null;
    }
}

As you add more methods and your application grows you will refactor those query execution methods and context factory method to separate classes to follow single responsibility on classes as well - you will get context factory and either some query provider or in some cases repository (but that repository will never return IQueryable or get Expression as parameter in any of its methods). This will also allow you following DRY principle where your context creation and most commonly used queries will be defined only once on one central place.

So at the end you can have something like this:

public class MyBLClass()
{
    private IContextFactory _contextFactory;
    private IUserQueryProvider _userProvider;

    public MyBLClass(IContextFactory contextFactory, IUserQueryProvider userProvider)
    {
        _contextFactory = contextFactory;
        _userProvider = userProvider;
    }

    public void MyBLMethod(int userId)
    {
        using (IMyContext entities = _contextFactory.GetContext())
        {
            User user = _userProvider.GetSingle(entities, userId);

            // Some BL Code here
        }
    }
}

Where those interfaces will look like:

public interface IContextFactory 
{
    IMyContext GetContext();
}

public class MyContextFactory : IContextFactory
{
    public IMyContext GetContext()
    {
        // Here belongs any logic necessary to create context
        // If you for example want to cache context per HTTP request
        // you can implement logic here.
        return new MyDbContext();
    } 
}

and

public interface IUserQueryProvider
{
    User GetUser(int userId);

    // Any other reusable queries for user entities
    // Non of queries returns IQueryable or accepts Expression as parameter
    // For example: IEnumerable<User> GetActiveUsers();
}

public class MyUserQueryProvider : IUserQueryProvider
{
    public User GetUser(IMyContext context, int userId)
    {
        return context.Users.Find(userId);
    }

    // Implementation of other queries

    // Only inside query implementations you can use extension methods on IQueryable
}

Your test will now only use fakes for context factory and query provider.

// NUnit + Moq unit test
[TestFixture]
public class MyBLClassTest
{
    private class FakeContext : IMyContext
    {
        // Create just empty implementation of context interface 
    }

    [Test]
    public void MyBLMethod_DoSomething() 
    {
        // Test setup
        int id = 10;
        var user = new User 
            { 
                Id = id, 
                // rest is your expected test data - that  is what faking is about
                // faked method returns simply data your test method expects
            };

        var contextFactory = new Mock<IContextFactory>();
        contextFactory.Setup(f => f.GetContext()).Returns(new FakeContext());

        var queryProvider = new Mock<IUserQueryProvider>();
        queryProvider.Setup(f => f.GetUser(It.IsAny<IContextFactory>(), id)).Returns(user);

        // Execution of method under test
        var myBLClass = new MyBLClass(contextFactory.Object, queryProvider.Object);
        myBLClass.MyBLMethod(id);

        // Test validation
        // Assert something you expect to happen on user instance 
        // inside MyBLMethod
    }
}

It would be little bit different in case of repository which should have reference to context passed to its constructor prior to injecting it to your business class. Your business class can still define some queries which are never use in any other classes - those queries are most probably part of its logic. You can also use extension methods to define some reusable part of queries but you must always use those extension methods outside of your core business logic which you want to unit test (either in query execution methods or in query provider / repository). That will allow you easy faking query provider or query execution methods.

I saw your previous question and thought about writing a blog post about that topic but the core of my opinion about testing with EF is in this answer.

Edit:

Repository is different topic which doesn't relate to your original question. Specific repository is still valid pattern. We are not against repositories, we are against generic repositories because they don't provide any additional features and don't solve any problem.

The problem is that repository alone doesn't solve anything. There are three patterns which have to be used together to form proper abstraction: Repository, Unit of Work and Specifications. All three are already available in EF: DbSet / ObjectSet as repositories, DbContext / ObjectContext as Unit of works and Linq to Entities as specifications. The main problem with custom implementation of generic repositories mentioned everywhere is that they replace only repository and unit of work with custom implementation but still depend on original specifications => abstraction is incomplete and it is leaking in tests where faked repository behaves in the same way as faked set / context.

The main disadvantage of my query provider is explicit method for any query you will need to execute. In case of repository you will not have such methods you will have just few methods accepting specification (but again those specifications should be defined in DRY principle) which will build query filtering conditions, ordering etc.

public interface IUserRepository
{
    User Find(int userId);
    IEnumerable<User> FindAll(ISpecification spec);
}

The discussion of this topic is far beyond the scope of this question and it requires you to do some self study.

Btw. mocking and faking has different purpose - you fake a call if you need to get testing data from method in the dependency and you mock the call if you need to assert that method on dependency was called with expected arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm so glad you're the one who answered, as you seem to be the 'Go-to-guy' regarding EF Testability. I have a couple of questions: You said you will get context factory and either some query provider or in some cases repository (but that repository will never return IQueryable or get Expression as parameter in any of its methods). This will also allow you following DRY principle where your context creation and most commonly used queries will be defined only once on one central place. - I thought you were totally against using repository. Can you please clarify with an example ? –  John Miner Jun 10 '12 at 11:32
    
Can you please also clarify this sentence : 'It would be little bit different in case of repository which should have reference to context passed to its constructor prior to injecting it to your business class.' (an example of a repository of this kind and when one should use it would be so much appreciated) –  John Miner Jun 10 '12 at 11:33
    
and finally - the last block you wrote : Your business class can still define some queries which are never use in any other classes - those queries are most probably part of its logic. - your first code example used this technique, right ? when would I use that and when would I use extension methods ? where do these extension methods go ? –  John Miner Jun 10 '12 at 11:35
    
Please elaborate on this : either in query execution methods or in query provider / repository. What is the difference between these three methods ? is query execution method just a method (like in the first code sample) and query provider the same thing only in a separate class ? and how does the 'repository' come into play here ? –  John Miner Jun 10 '12 at 11:36
1  
I added examples of tests to explain faking little bit more in detail. –  Ladislav Mrnka Jun 10 '12 at 12:03

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