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I'm looking for a python library which comes with support to convert numbers between various SI prefixes, for example, kilo to pico, nano to giga and so on.What would you recommend?

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possible duplicate of Unit Conversion in Python –  GWW Jun 10 '12 at 15:07
    
@GWW: Not really, that question wants to convert units, this is about prefixes. –  Junuxx Jun 10 '12 at 15:28
    
@Zed: It isn't really clear what you want to do. What is the format of the input, for example? Strings? Numbers and strings? Numbers and a prefix index? It might help if you gave an example of what you want to do exactly. –  Junuxx Jun 10 '12 at 15:30
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But since the number of prefixes is fairly limited, you might be better of with a simple dictionary (e.g. {'giga':1e9, 'kilo':1e3, 'milli':1e-3, ...}) –  Junuxx Jun 10 '12 at 15:32
    
@Junuxx thanks! That's exactly what I did. –  Zed Jun 10 '12 at 21:52
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2 Answers

Dictionaries

If you don't want to use any 3rd-party library like the ones listed below, you can actually implement your own parsing function.

Use a dictionary to match up the prefixes to their values. I've done it for you already:

_prefix = {'y': 1e-24,  # yocto
           'z': 1e-21,  # zepto
           'a': 1e-18,  # atto
           'f': 1e-15,  # femto
           'p': 1e-12,  # pico
           'n': 1e-9,   # nano
           'u': 1e-6,   # micro
           'm': 1e-3,   # mili
           'c': 1e-2,   # centi
           'd': 1e-1,   # deci
           'k': 1e3,    # kilo
           'M': 1e6,    # mega
           'G': 1e9,    # giga
           'T': 1e12,   # tera
           'P': 1e15,   # peta
           'E': 1e18,   # exa
           'Z': 1e21,   # zetta
           'Y': 1e24,   # yotta
    }

Then you can use regex (as described by my answer here) to search or parse the input and use the dictionary for getting the appropriate value.


Unum

Unum is well finished and thoroughly documented library.

Pros:

  • allows you to define arbitrary units (magnitude only supports user-defined units as long as they are a combination of the base units).

Cons:

  • doesn't handle prefixes well
  • clutters your namespace with all its unit definitions (you end up with variables named M, S etc. in your namespace)

Magnitude

You can also use Magnitude, another library. It supports all the kinds of SI unit prefixes you're talking about, plus it'll handle the parsing as well. From the site:

A physical quantity is a number with a unit, like 10 km/h. Units are specified as strings. They can be any of the SI units, plus a bunch of non-SI, bits, dollars, and any combination of them. They can include the standard SI prefixes.
...
All standard prefixes are understood, from yocto to yotta and from kibi to exbi.

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Regex doesn't sound like the best way to detect which prefix to use. Doesn't log(abs(value)) give you the size of your value in a form you can use to select a prefix. –  Jonathan Hartley Nov 12 '13 at 11:22
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Hey guys I know its a little bit late answer but whoever find it lets check my solution. I don't know if it is the best one either the worse one but it is working in my case. I am working for first time with python so I take negative responses (if they can be with explanations)... also positive ones are ok :D
This is my code

class Units:
def __init__(self):
    global si;
    si = {
          -18 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 18, 'prefix' : 'a'},
          -17 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 18, 'prefix' : 'a'},
          -16 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 18, 'prefix' : 'a'},
          -15 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 15, 'prefix' : 'f'},
          -14 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 15, 'prefix' : 'f'},
          -13 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 15, 'prefix' : 'f'},
          -12 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 12, 'prefix' : 'p'},
          -11 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 12, 'prefix' : 'p'},
          -10 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 12, 'prefix' : 'p'},
          -9 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 9, 'prefix' : 'n'},
          -8 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 9, 'prefix' : 'n'},
          -7 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 9, 'prefix' : 'n'},
          -6 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 6, 'prefix' : 'u'},
          -5 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 6, 'prefix' : 'u'},
          -4 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 6, 'prefix' : 'u'},
          -3 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 3, 'prefix' : 'm'},
          -2 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 2, 'prefix' : 'c'},
          -1 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 1, 'prefix' : 'd'},
           0 : {'multiplier' : 1, 'prefix' : ''},
           1 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 1, 'prefix' : 'd'},
           2 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 3, 'prefix' : 'k'},
           3 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 3, 'prefix' : 'k'},
           4 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 3, 'prefix' : 'k'},
           5 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 3, 'prefix' : 'k'},
           6 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 6, 'prefix' : 'M'},
           7 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 6, 'prefix' : 'M'},
           8 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 6, 'prefix' : 'M'},
           9 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 9, 'prefix' : 'G'},
          10 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 9, 'prefix' : 'G'},
          11 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 9, 'prefix' : 'G'},
          12 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 12, 'prefix' : 'T'},
          13 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 12, 'prefix' : 'T'},
          14 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 12, 'prefix' : 'T'},
          15 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 15, 'prefix' : 'P'},
          16 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 15, 'prefix' : 'P'},
          17 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 15, 'prefix' : 'P'},
          18 : {'multiplier' : 10 ** 18, 'prefix' : 'E'},
          }

def convert(self, number):
    # Checking if its negative or positive
    if number < 0:
        negative = True;
    else:
        negative = False;

    # if its negative converting to positive (math.log()....)
    if negative:
        number = number - (number*2);

    # Taking the exponent
    exponent = int(math.log10(number));

    # Checking if it was negative converting it back to negative
    if negative:
        number = number - (number*2);

    # If the exponent is smaler than 0 dividing the exponent with -1
    if exponent < 0:
        exponent = exponent-1;
        return [number * si[exponent]['multiplier'], si[exponent]['prefix']]; 
    # If the exponent bigger than 0 just return it
    elif exponent > 0:
        return [number / si[exponent]['multiplier'], si[exponent]['prefix']]; 
    # If the exponent is 0 than return only the value
    elif exponent == 0:
        return [number, ''];


And this is how it is working:

c1 = +1.189404E-010
fres = -4.07237500000000E+007;
ls = +1.943596E-005;

units = sci.Units();
rValue, rPrefix = units.convert(c1);
print rValue;
print rPrefix;

print units.convert(fres);
print units.convert(ls);

And the response is:

118.9404
p
[-40.72375, 'M']
[19.435959999999998, 'u']

I don't know if you are going to like it or not. I hope you do. I've posted here so the people who want help to see it also to give them an idea maybe they can optimize it :)

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