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I want to allow my users to update their account details. To simplify, suppose that the account model consists of ID, Name, Surname, Username, and Password, and that I only want the user to be able to change Name and Surname. The problem is that if I pass the account model to the view I would need to create hidden fields for ID, Username, and Password. Now even though I can encrypt this data, putting the password in the view is not secure.

An alternative approach would be to create an EditAccount view model which contains the ID, Name and Surname only, but then in the controller action I would need to search again for the user being modified and manually assign the new Name and Surname before saving, an approach which is not particularly neat. Do you have any suggestions in scenarios like this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Definitely create a separate ViewModel that does not include Password and send that to the edit view. It is perfectly normal to use specific ViewModels for specific needs. That's what ViewModels are for. They're lightweight and reusable. They are meant to reshape your entity data to meet the needs of the UI to include only what you need. That is the preferred method as it works with the MVC pattern and not against it.

If you want, you can create an inheritance Hierarchy such as having a non-sensitive data ViewModel and one for sensitive data that inherits non-sensitive for the needs of changing a user's password. Such as:

Use this for editing the user:

public class UserEditViewModel {

    public int ID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public string Surname { get; set; }
}

Use this when you need User info plus Password. Use this model when you want to allow the user to edit their password

public class SensitiveUserViewModel : UserEditViewModel {

    [Required]
    public string Username { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [DataType(DataType.Password)]
    [Display(Name = "Current Password")]
    public string OldPassword { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [StringLength(100, ErrorMessage = "The {0} must be at least {2} characters long", MinimumLength = 6)]
    [DataType(DataType.Password)]
    [Display(Name = "New Password")]
    public string NewPassword { get; set; }

    [DataType(DataType.Password)]
    [Display(Name = "Confirm New Password")]
    [Compare("NewPassword", ErrorMessage = "The new password and confirmation password do not match")]
    public string ConfirmPassword { get; set; }
}

Your View that did the editing would have these actions. This way editing the non-sensitive user info has only the data you need and there's no issue with security.

public ActionResult EditUser(int ID) {
    // get User by ID
    var model = new UserEditViewModel();
    // map your entity fields to ViewModel
    return View(model);
}

public ActionResult EditUser(UserEditViewModel model) {
    if(ModelState.IsValid) {
        // save user edits
    }
    return View(model);
}

You should use a separate View to allow the User to edit password info. This way you can use the SensitiveUserViewModel so you have all the data, the sensitive and the non-sensitive properties. This keeps everything clean because all your properties are in one place and is being used only for changing Password, not editing the Name, Surname

public ActionResult ChangePassword(int ID) {
    // get user by ID
    var model = new SensitiveUserViewModel();
    // map your entity to ViewModel
    return View(model);
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult ChangePassword(SensitiveUserViewModel model) {
    if(ModelState.IsValid) {
        // save user password info
    }
    return View(model);
}
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Yes that's what I implied with my second option. It is the most logical way, but, is there a way to transfer the view model's state to the model without having to assign every property individually. In other words, in the "save user info" part is there an alternative to writing model.PropertyName = viewModel.PropertyName. I am asking because if you have many properties this would not be maintainable. Would you consider using reflection to do such a task? –  user1447435 Jun 10 '12 at 20:18
    
Reflection, no. It's just a nature of the beast, but you can use Automapper that handles all that for you. I've always done manual assignment for years and never thought anything about it because that's just how it's done. But now Automapper will do all that for you. Have a look at it at automapper.org –  CD Smith Jun 10 '12 at 20:28

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