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I'm writing a live chat room based application using node.js + express.js on the server side, with backbone.js for the client, and socket.io for handling communication.

There are a couple of issues I'm facing here :

1) A cross domain request issue :

var ChatRoom = Backbone.Model.extend( {
    defaults : {
        socket : "",
        scoreBoard : {},
        qMaster : "",
        questionSrc : "",
    },

    initialize : function( scoreServer ) {                      
        this.socket = io.connect( scoreServer );
        var newScores = {};

        this.socket.on('connect', function() {
            console.log( "Connected!" );
        });

        this.socket.on('updateScores', function( scoreUpdates ) { 
        _.each( scoreUpdates, function( update ) {
            newScores[ update['name'] ] = update['score'];
        });
    });
});
var chatRoom = new ChatRoom( "http://localhost:8080/" );

When I create an object like this, I get a cross-origin error when a connection is attempted in the call to io.connect. The output on Chrome :

XMLHttpRequest cannot load http://[object%20object]:8080/socket.io/1/?t=1339342280788. Cross origin requests are only supported for HTTP.

What exactly changed the host in the socket.io call to [object%20object]?

http://localhost:8080 is the server that created the page. However, when I remove the socket as a member of ChatRoom, and do the handler binding as follows :

var ChatRoom = Backbone.Model.extend( {
    defaults : {
        scoreBoard : {},
        qMaster : "",
        questionSrc : "",
    },

    initialize : function( ) {                      
        var newScores = {};

        socket.on('connect', function() {
            console.log( "Connected!" );
        });

        socket.on('updateScores', function( scoreUpdates ) { 
        _.each( scoreUpdates, function( update ) {
            newScores[ update['name'] ] = update['score'];
        });
    });
});

var socket = io.connect( "http://localhost:8080" );
var chatRoom = new ChatRoom();

Things work without a hitch in this case. How is this possible?

2) Upon successful connection of the client to my socket.io server, I have the following socket broadcast command :

io.sockets.on( 'connection', function( socket ) {
    console.log("Got here");
    socket.broadcast.emit( 'updateScores', scoreUpdate );

(Note : 'scoreUpdate' is initialized elsewhere). The debug messages on the socket server indicate that the broadcast is executed, but inserting an "alert" command for the 'updateScores' event handler on the client does not show up. In fact, nothing is even written into the socket. However, its only when a second client connects to the same server, that the appropriate event handler is called.

Is there some subtlety I'm missing in the broadcast command? Is there no broadcast done when there is a single client?

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2 Answers 2

Okay, I've resolved Question (1).

Essentially, the model instantiation should have been :

var chatRoom = new ChatRoom( {"server" : "http://localhost:8080"} );

D'oh!

Issue 2 still persists though.

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2) A quotation from the official site:

Broadcasting messages.

To broadcast, simply add a broadcast flag to emit and send method calls. Broadcasting means sending a message to everyone else except for the socket that starts it.

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But in this case, its the server that is carrying out the broadcast, not the client. –  darthshak Jun 11 '12 at 10:28
    
@darthshak Oh, sorry, I've totally missed it. –  theotheo Jun 11 '12 at 12:57
    
That's okay. There's also some bad presentation on my part that's at fault. I am a StackOverflow noob at the end of the day:) –  darthshak Jun 11 '12 at 14:26
    
@darthshak, Sorry again :), but I've read more carefully your question, and I think, my answer is exactly what you find. Your client opens a socket and sends connection message; the server receives connection message from the client socket and then emits a message to everyone «except for the socket that starts it», i.e. except a client, that just sent connection message. Does it make sense? Or maybe now I don't understand something. That's possible because I'm a native Russian speaker, not English. –  theotheo Jun 11 '12 at 14:39
    
Hmm, okay. Yeah, makes sense :) So the way I see it, socket.broadcast does not work when a single client is connected. I guess I should program a fallback to a simple socket.emit when only a single client is connected. Thanks a ton! –  darthshak Jun 12 '12 at 5:57

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