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I´m trying to extend a Java ArrayList to support events as described in this example: http://www.exampledepot.com/egs/java.util/CustEvent.html

The problem is that java is reporting that 'Cannot make a static reference to the non-static type MyEvent' in the following line:

public interface MyEventListener extends EventListener {
    public void myEventOccurred(MyEvent evt);
}

I think that is something related to Generics, but I really don´t know how to solve this issue. Does anybody can help me?

Here is the full source of what I´m trying to do:

public class ArrayList<E> extends java.util.ArrayList<E> {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    // Declare the event. It must extend EventObject.
    public class MyEvent extends EventObject {

        private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

        public MyEvent(Object source) {

            super(source);
        }
    }

    // Declare the listener class. It must extend EventListener.
    // A class must implement this interface to get MyEvents.
    public interface MyEventListener extends EventListener {
        public void myEventOccurred(MyEvent evt); //Error occurs here
    }
}
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Make your inner class static. –  Prince John Wesley Jun 10 '12 at 16:47
    
why are you extending ArrayList for a custom event implementation –  mprabhat Jun 10 '12 at 16:56
    
@mprabhat, it´s due a design requirement of an Android app that is being built. This android app needs to be notified when the ArrayList is changed, in a synchronized multithreaded process. –  regisxp Jun 11 '12 at 3:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's a more complex solution and a simpler one. The simpler one: Don't use inner classes or interfaces here; there's simply no need, and they only complicate matters. As an aside, why is your class given the same name as the core class? If that compiles (and I'm guessing it does), it's highly confusing to all.

Edit: and in your link, none of those classes or interfaces are meant to be inner, so you've transcribed it wrong. Again, put each class and interface in its own file. There are times when you will want to use inner classes, but this is most definitely not one of them.

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you are right! I didn´t noticed about not using inner classes! Thanks a lot for your advice! –  regisxp Jun 10 '12 at 17:45

As indicated by other users, you can do all classes and interfaces in their own files and then you won't have a problem - and this is a better approach. If you are intent on using inner classes and interfaces, then you need to declare them static:

public class ArrayList<E> extends java.util.ArrayList<E> {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    // Declare the event. It must extend EventObject.
    public static class MyEvent extends EventObject {

        private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

        public MyEvent(Object source) {

            super(source);
        }
    }

    // Declare the listener class. It must extend EventListener.
    // A class must implement this interface to get MyEvents.
    public static interface MyEventListener extends EventListener {
        public void myEventOccurred(MyEvent evt); //Error occurs here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I strongly recommend against using static inner classes for this. He should just use standard stand-alone classes as you first recommend. 1+ up-vote –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 10 '12 at 16:48
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels I'm not advocating using inner classes, as I stated in the beginning. However if the OP is set on using them, then static is the way to solve his problems. –  Aleks G Jun 10 '12 at 16:50
    
Yes, I edited my comment and up-voted you. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 10 '12 at 16:50
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels Thanks –  Aleks G Jun 10 '12 at 16:51
    
@AleksG, thanks a lot for your advice. I tested your approach, using a static class, and it also works. Thanks a lot! –  regisxp Jun 10 '12 at 17:47

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