Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to create a CGColor form the HTML representation string like [NSColor colorWithHTMLName:] But only by means of CoreGraphics

share|improve this question
2  
GIMME TEH CODEZ-style questions are not considered to be good. What have you tried? –  user529758 Jun 10 '12 at 17:31
    

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try something like this:

CGColorRef CGColorFromHTMLString(NSString *str)
{
    // remove the leading "#" and add a "0x" prefix
    str = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"0x%@", [str substringWithRange:NSMakeRange(1, str.length - 1)]];

    NSScanner *scanner;
    uint32_t result;

    scanner = [NSScanner scannerWithString:str];
    [scanner scanHexInt:&result];

    CGColorRef color = CGColorCreateGenericRGB(((result >> 16) & 0xff) / 255.0, ((result >> 8) & 0xff) / 255.0, ((result >> 0) & 0xff) / 255.0, 1.0);

    return color;
}

Don't forget to free the result after use by calling CGColorRelease on it.

EDIT: if you don't want to use Foundation, try CFStringRef or a plain C string:

CGColorRef CGColorFromHTMLString(const char *str)
{

    uint32_t result;
    sscanf(str + 1, "%x", &result);

    CGColorRef color = CGColorCreateGenericRGB(((result >> 16) & 0xff) / 255.0, ((result >> 8) & 0xff) / 255.0, ((result >> 0) & 0xff) / 255.0, 1.0);

    return color;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man ! +1 from me, posting pure CoreGraphics solution as an another answer –  deimus Jun 10 '12 at 17:56
    
No problem. (I'm just familiar with the docs -- where to look for this and that.) –  user529758 Jun 10 '12 at 17:57
    
Wait -- you don't have to use Foundation classes. CFStringRef is toll-free bridged with NSString. See my edit. –  user529758 Jun 10 '12 at 17:58
    
Ok man thanks, accepting yours as an answer ! :) –  deimus Jun 10 '12 at 18:04

Thanks to H2CO3 !

Here is the CoreGraphics solution i.e. no Foundation classes but Coregraphics and C++

    // Remove the preceding "#" symbol
    if (backGroundColor.find("#") != string::npos) {
        backGroundColor = backGroundColor.substr(1);
    }
    unsigned int decimalValue;
    sscanf(backGroundColor.c_str(), "%x", &decimalValue); 
    printf("\nstring=%s, decimalValue=%u",backGroundColor.c_str(), decimalValue);

    CGColorRef result = CGColorCreateGenericRGB(((decimalValue >> 16) & 0xff) / 255.0, ((decimalValue >> 8) & 0xff) / 255.0, ((decimalValue >> 0) & 0xff) / 255.0, 1.0);
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry man, just an incident –  deimus Jul 31 '12 at 14:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.