Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to optimize the simulation function in my experiment so I can have more artificial brain-controlled agents running at a time. I profiled my code and found out that the big bottleneck in my code right now is computing the relative angle from every agent to every agent, which is O(n2), minus some small optimizations I have done. Here is the current code snippet I have for computing the angle:

[C++]
double calcAngle(double fromX, double fromY, double fromAngle, double toX, double toY)
{
    double d = 0.0;
    double Ux = 0.0, Uy = 0.0, Vx = 0.0, Vy = 0.0;

    d = sqrt( calcDistanceSquared(fromX, fromY, toX, toY) );

    Ux = (toX - fromX) / d;

    Uy = (toY - fromY) / d;

    Vx = cos(fromAngle * (cPI / 180.0));
    Vy = sin(fromAngle * (cPI / 180.0));

    return atan2(((Ux * Vy) - (Uy * Vx)), ((Ux * Vx) + (Uy * Vy))) * 180.0 / cPI;
}

I have two 2D points (x1, y1) and (x2, y2) and the facing of the "from" point (xa). I want to compute the angle that agent x needs to turn (relative to its current facing) to face agent y.

According to the profiler, the most expensive part is the atan2. I have Googled for hours and the above solution is the best solution I could find. Does anyone know of a more efficient way to compute the angle between two points? I am willing to sacrifice a little accuracy (+/- 1-2 degrees) for speed, if that affects anything.

share|improve this question
1  
No, sorry. Floating-point nonlinear math is expensive. –  user529758 Jun 10 '12 at 18:09
1  
"the big bottleneck in my code right now is computing the relative angle from every agent to every agent" Have you considered... not doing that? First, vector math usually doesn't need angles; it just uses vectors. What functions are you using where you need an angle specifically? Second, why do you need to compute this for every pair of agents? Don't you only need to compute it for those who are close to one another? There are many techniques for dealing with grouping nearby entities. –  Nicol Bolas Jun 10 '12 at 18:16
    
How About lookup tables for sin andere cos? Did you consider?? –  Matthias Jun 10 '12 at 18:17
    
@Nicol: I am simulating a 180 degree frontal retina for every agent, so I need the angle so I know which portion of the retina to mark as "having another agent in it." I already precompute the distance and filter out agents that are outside of the agent's possible vision distance. I have also thought about somehow figuring out if agent y is in front of agent x before deciding to compute the relative angle, but I have found that to be a difficult problem without incurring similar costs of just computing the angle directly. –  Randy Olson Jun 10 '12 at 18:22
    
@Matthias: I doubt that will be faster (assuming we're talking about a modern desktop/server platform here). –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 10 '12 at 18:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As has been mentioned in the comments, there are probably high-level approaches to reduce your computational load.

But to the question in hand, you can just use the dot-product relationship:

theta = acos ( a . b / ||a|| ||b|| )

where a and b are your vectors, . denotes "dot product" and || || denotes "vector magnitude".

Essentially, this will replace your {sqrt, cos, sin, atan2} with {sqrt, acos}.

I would also suggest sticking to radians for all internal calculations, only converting to and from degrees for human-readable I/O.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a stable C++ library out there that automatically handles this kind of game logic, a la XNA Game Studio's library for C#? –  Randy Olson Jun 10 '12 at 18:48
    
@RandyOlson: That's out of my area of expertise, I'm afraid. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 10 '12 at 18:49
    
Why do you need a library if you know how to calculate a dot product and a magnitude? It's hardly worthy of a library. –  duffymo Jun 10 '12 at 18:55
    
There's much more to game mechanics than just the dot product and magnitude of a vector. –  Randy Olson Jun 10 '12 at 19:04
    
You don't need sqrt I think: (a . b / ||a|| ||b||)² = cosθ² =(1+cos2θ)/2 –  MSalters Jun 12 '12 at 13:41

Your comment tells a lot: "I am simulating a 180 degree frontal retina for every agent, so I need the angle". No, you don't. You just need to know whether the angle between the position vector and vision vector is more or less than 90 degrees.

That's very easy: the dot product A·B is >0 if the angle between A and B is less than 90 degrees; 0 if the angle is precisely 90 degrees, and <0 if the angle is more than 90 degrees. Calculating this takes 3 multiplications and 2 additions.

share|improve this answer
    
I eventually need the precise(ish) angle to know which portion of the retina to mark as "having an agent in it," but this is a great idea for further cutting down on the number of times that this function is called. What about if I had a 90-degree frontal retina? Thanks! –  Randy Olson Jun 12 '12 at 13:29
    
In that case, see Oli's answer (and my comment there) - you need a single acos and the rest is just +-*/ –  MSalters Jun 12 '12 at 13:43
    
Also, you probably don't need the angle. it's often easier to use the relative vector projected on the retina plane. Formula: V_projected = V - Normal*(V·Normal) (The normal is the unit vector perpendicular to the plane). –  MSalters Jun 12 '12 at 13:51

i think it's more a mathematical problem:

try

abs(arctan((y1-yfrom)/(x1-xfrom)) - arctan(1/((y2-yfrom2)/(x2-xfrom2))))

share|improve this answer
    
note that the result will be in radians and you have to divide it by pi and multiply it by 180 to get degrees –  libjup Jun 10 '12 at 18:19
    
isn't fromAngle an angle whereas x1, x2, y1,y2 are coordinates? not sure what you subtract here. –  Mare Infinitus Jun 10 '12 at 18:21
    
xfrom and yfrom are both coordinates from where the line starts ... xfrom would be equivalent to his "xa": "facing of the "from" point (xa)" –  libjup Jun 10 '12 at 18:25

Use the dot product of these two vectors and at worst you need to do an inverse cosine instead:

A = Facing direction. B = Direction of Agent Y from Agent X

Calculating the dot is simple multiplication and addition. From that you have the cosine of the angle.

share|improve this answer

For starters, you should realize that there are a couple of simplifications that can reduce the calculations a bit:

  1. You need not calculate the angle from an agent to itself,
  2. If you have the angle from agent i to agent j, you already know something about the angle from agent j back to agent i.

I have to ask: what does "agent i turn to face agent j" mean? If the two surfaces are looking right at each other, do you have to do a calculation? What tolerance do you have on "looking right at each other"?

It'd be easier to recommend what to do if you'd stop focusing on the mathematics and describe the problem more fully.

share|improve this answer
    
Already doing 1, of course. :-) Unfortunately 2 doesn't eliminate the atan2, since the atan2 is done relative to the facing of the "from" agent. –  Randy Olson Jun 11 '12 at 1:47
    
I am simulating a 180 degree frontal retina for every agent, so I need the angle so I know which portion of the retina to mark as "having another agent in it." I already precompute the distance and filter out agents that are outside of the agent's possible vision distance. I have also thought about somehow figuring out if agent y is in front of agent x before deciding to compute the relative angle, but I have found that to be a difficult problem without incurring similar costs of just computing the angle directly. –  Randy Olson Jun 11 '12 at 1:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.