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//This is the header file (header.h)
class about{

char w[10][40];

public:
void get(const char core[ ][2000], int num);


};

~ ~

//This is the cpp file (program.cpp)
 #include "header.h"
 #include <cstring>


void about::get(const char core[ ][2000], int num){

char data[2000];


strcpy(w[0], data);


}

I'm getting program.cpp:13: error: 'w' was not declared in this scope

I'm trying to just do the strcpy from data which contain some info to w which is from the private section of the class and using the member function to access them.

I'm not sure if I forgot anything and why I can't access them.

Thanks to the last answer from Sergey Vakulenko

The sequence of the header file is very important.

It should be

 #include <cstring>
 #include "header.h"

not

 #include "header.h"
 #include <cstring>
share|improve this question
    
#include "header.h" from program.cpp? –  Charles Bailey Jun 10 '12 at 18:13
    
Yes I did sorry forgot to include in the post. –  Ali Jun 10 '12 at 18:13
1  
ideone.com/Bj6VU, your code should compile. –  wroniasty Jun 10 '12 at 18:16
    
@wroniasty could that be the main program from my professor has a problem? –  Ali Jun 10 '12 at 18:17
    
hard to tell, maybe you are including a different "header.h" than you are showing us? –  wroniasty Jun 10 '12 at 18:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

add these headers to your cpp file:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "nameofheader.h"

Edit (more full explication ):

for me, that exemple not give any error:

1.h:

class about{

char w[10][40];

public:
void get(const char core[ ][2000], int num);


};

1.cpp:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "1.h"
//This is the cpp file (program.cpp)

void about::get(const char core[ ][2000], int num){

char data[2000];


strcpy(w[0], data);


}

int main (int argc, char** argv) {

return 0;
}

compled with g++:

g++ 1.cpp -o 1

share|improve this answer
    
I think that have that already? –  Ali Jun 10 '12 at 18:21
    
I found out now and yes it makes a different in your code because of the sequence! the header file should be after not before.... I don't know why it makes a different, but now it works after changed. –  Ali Jun 10 '12 at 18:25

Your program, the way you are showing it to us here, should compile without problems:

ideone.com/Bj6VU

If you want more help, you should make the all of the two files you are compiling (program.cpp and header.h) available.

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