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I have a list with nested lists and I want to create a function (modify_list) that gets a tuple and modifies the passed pointer with a passed value argument. The problem is that I'm not sure how to modify a nested value like this programmatically by reference.

Simplified example:

l = [[1, [2,3, [4,5,6]]]]

If I call the function modify_list, these would be how to use it and the expected results:

> l[0][1][2][2]
6

> modify_list((0, 1, 2, 2), 8)
> l
[[1, [2,3, [4,5,8]]]]

> modify_list((0, 1, 1), 14)
> l
[[1, [2,14, [4,5,8]]]]

Thanks

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1  
Is this a homework? If not why doyou need such function? –  Tomasz Wysocki Jun 10 '12 at 18:22
    
Hahaha, sorry no homework, I guess the question seemed so easy that looked like it. I was having a thick day and the example was oversimplified to express the problem I was having. –  maraujop Jun 11 '12 at 7:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can determine each sublist by accessing it with the respective index. Use the last index to assign the value:

def set_nested_val(l, indices, val):
  for i in indices[:-1]:
    l = l[i]
  l[indices[-1]] = val

Note that this function operates on an arbitrary list (the first argument), and not only l. If you want to always modify l, use functools.partial:

import functools
l = [[1, [2,3, [4,5,6]]]]
modify_list = functools.partial(set_nested_val, l)

Note that nested lists, and accessing values by indicies, are often a sign of a bad data architecture. Have you considered a dict whose keys are tuples?

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Thanks. It didn't occur to me that passing the last index using list[index] would be good enough, so I got stuck. The lists example was an oversimplified example of what I'm trying to do. I agree that doing nested lists wouldn't be the right thing to do most likely. –  maraujop Jun 11 '12 at 7:44
def modify_list(indices, new_value):
    x = reduce(lambda x, i: x[i], indices[:-1], l)
    x[indices[-1]] = new_value

Example:

>>> l = [[1, [2, 3, [4, 5, 6]]]]
>>> modify_list((0, 1, 2, 2), 8)
>>> l
[[1, [2, 3, [4, 5, 8]]]]

This method matches what you are asking for in your question, but it probably makes more sense to pass in the list that you want to mutate instead of always modifying the global variable:

def modify_list(lst, indices, new_value):
    x = reduce(lambda x, i: x[i], indices[:-1], lst)
    x[indices[-1]] = new_value

>>> l = [[1, [2, 3, [4, 5, 6]]]]
>>> modify_list(l, (0, 1, 2, 2), 8)
>>> l
[[1, [2, 3, [4, 5, 8]]]]
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Try this:

def modify_list(lst, pos, val):
    item = lst
    while len(pos) > 1:
        item = item[pos[0]]
        pos = pos[1:]
    item[pos[0]] = val

Or this:

def modify_list(lst, pos, val):
    item = lst
    for i in pos[:-1]:
        item = item[i]
    item[pos[-1]] = val

Or this:

def modify_list(lst, pos, val):
    reduce(lambda a, e: a[e], pos[:-1], lst)[pos[-1]] = val

In any case, use it like this:

lst = [[1, [2, 3, [4, 5, 6]]]]
modify_list(lst, (0, 1, 2, 2), 8)

lst
> [[1, [2, 3, [4, 5, 8]]]]
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