Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Often when writing PHP I'll have it output some HTML like this -

echo "<a href="../" title="link title">".$link_text."</a>";

Obviously this won't parse as I need to escape the double quotes in the attributes of the <a> element. Is there a regex that would quickly do this rather than me manually adding the backslashes?

One other thing - the regex shouldn't escape double quotes outside of the tag (e.g. where I've appended the $link_text variable.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You should just use single-quotes instead:

echo '<a href="../" title="link title">' . $link_text . '</a>';
share|improve this answer
4  
not to forget htmlspecialchars($link_text) –  Tomalak Jul 8 '09 at 10:05
1  
I disagree with htmlspecialchars inline when printing, by the time you print all arguments should already be clean. –  joebert Jul 8 '09 at 10:13
    
anyway, @joebert, htmlspecialchars must be used before printing :) –  Maciej Łebkowski Jul 8 '09 at 10:38
    
Thanks - looks like switching to single quotes is the simple (and possibly fastest?) solution. Also - appreciate the concern about cleaning output using htmlspecialchars(). I left it out of the example code for clarity. –  Phil Jul 8 '09 at 10:53
    
yes, most likely the single quotes method would be the fastest –  Maciej Łebkowski Jul 8 '09 at 11:47
show 2 more comments

Solutions I can come up with (not without escaping):

  • Single quotes

    echo '<a href="../">' . $link_text. '</a>';
    
  • Use double quotes

    echo "<a href='../'>$link_text</a>";
    
  • Sprintf

    echo sprintf('<a href="../">%s</a>', $link_text);
    
  • Use HEREDOC

    echo <<<EOF
    <a href="../">$link_text</a>
    EOF;
    
  • Use template engine like smarty

  • Exit PHP-mode:

    ?><a href="../"><?php echo $link_text ?></a><?php // other code...
    

BTW, be sure to use htmlspecialchars() on $link_text variable, or you’ll have a XSS security hole.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - looks like switching to single quotes is the simple (and possibly fastest?) solution. Also - appreciate the concern about the cleaning output using htmlspecialchars(). I left it out of the example code for clarity. –  Phil Jul 8 '09 at 10:52
    
lol why 'echo sprintf' just use 'printf' ;) –  SalmanPK Mar 22 '11 at 18:02
add comment

Use (This syntax dont worry about quotes etc)

echo <<<EOT
<a href="../" title="link title">$link_text</a>
EOT;
share|improve this answer
1  
I think that the outer quotes are not meant to appear there. –  Svante Jul 8 '09 at 10:16
    
sorry my mistake –  ish1301 Jul 8 '09 at 10:35
add comment

I'd strongly suggest using templating instead of trying to build strings.

In raw PHP:

<a href="../" title="link title"><?php echo $link_text; ?></a>
share|improve this answer
    
Point taken - though there's times when I just want to quickly output a small string of HTML (from say a function or method) and using a templating engine is a bit overkill. –  Phil Jul 8 '09 at 10:58
add comment

use single quotes or use heredoc. I'd prefer the last.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.