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I need help making my permutation's (order important, repeatable) size smaller by discarding the unneeded permutations before hand.

  • The current permutation takes a global minimum and maximum from the values provided. However, some of the permutations are discarded afterward as they don't fall within the range needed.

  • The idea is there are for example 3 numbers which need a permutation. For example: 1-3, 8-10 and 5-15. The current code will create a permutation of 1-15 even though values from 4-7 will be discarded later on.

Unfortunately in some instances its not possible to create an array large enough in Java to contain the permutation results.

Any help would be appreciated on changing this permutation to only include necessary values prior to computing the permutation.

PermutationCore:

public class PermutationCore {
    private String[] a;
    private int n;

    public PermutationCore(String[] arrayOfPossibilities, int lengthOfPermutation) {
        this.a = arrayOfPossibilities;
        this.n = lengthOfPermutation;
    }

    public String[][] getVariations() {
        int l = a.length;
        int permutations = (int) Math.pow(l, n);

        Co.println("Permutation array size: " + permutations);

        String[][] table = new String[permutations][n];

        for (int x = 0; x < n; x++) {
            int t2 = (int) Math.pow(l, x);
            for (int p1 = 0; p1 < permutations;) {
                for (int al = 0; al < l; al++) {
                    for (int p2 = 0; p2 < t2; p2++) {
                        table[p1][x] = a[al];
                        p1++;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return table;
    }
}

Permutation

public class Permutation {
    private ArrayList<Iteration> listOfIteration = new ArrayList<Iteration>();
    private boolean prepared;
    private PermutationCore permutationCore;
    private int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
    private int max = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
    private int count = 0;
    private String[][] arrayOfStringResults;

    public void addIteration(Iteration iteration){
        if (prepared){throw new IllegalStateException("Permuation is already prepared. Create a new instance to add new items");}
        this.listOfIteration.add(iteration);
    }

    public void prepare(){
        String[] arrayOfString;

        for (Iteration iteration : listOfIteration){
            if (iteration.end > max){max = iteration.end;}
            if (iteration.start < min){min = iteration.start;}
        }

        arrayOfString = new String[max-min+1];

        for (int i=0; i<arrayOfString.length; i++){
            arrayOfString[i] = String.valueOf(min+i);
        }

        permutationCore = new PermutationCore(arrayOfString, listOfIteration.size());

        prepared = true;

//      Co.println("Min/max: " + min + "," + max);

        arrayOfStringResults = permutationCore.getVariations();
//      ArrayTools.sort2DStringArray(arrayOfStringResults);

    }

    public boolean iterate(){
        LABEL_ITERATE_LOOP: {
            int i=0;

            if (count == arrayOfStringResults.length){
                return false;
            }

            for (Iteration iteration : listOfIteration){
                int currentValue = Integer.valueOf(arrayOfStringResults[count][i]);

                if (currentValue > iteration.end || currentValue < iteration.start){
                    //Co.println("Failed at: " + iteration.start + "," + iteration.end + " / " + currentValue);
                    count++;
                    break LABEL_ITERATE_LOOP;
                }

                iteration.current = currentValue;
                i++;
            }

            count++;
        }

        return true;
    }

    public Iteration getIteration(Object request) {
        for (Iteration iteration : listOfIteration){
            if (iteration.request == request){
                return iteration;
            }
        }

        return null;
    }

    public ArrayList<Iteration> getListOfIterations(){
        return listOfIteration;
    }

    public static class Iteration{
        private int start;
        private int end;
        private int current;
        private Object request;

        public Iteration(int start, int end, Object request){
            this.start = start;
            this.end = end;
            this.request = request;
        }

        public double getCurrentValue(){
            return this.current;
        }

        public Object getRequest(){
            return this.request;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

This of your problem as permuting k numbers from 0 to (n-1), and printing a[n] instead of n. :) That is what you can do, to reduce iterations.

The other way to do it, is to use a number between 0 to n!-1 and figure out what the current permutation is, and print it. Although it is a slower method, it's faster to resume operations in this format - and we can quickly print the kth permutation.

Let us say the numbers are: 1, 2, 3, 4. There are a total of 4! permutation = 24, possible. To print the 15th (counting from zero) permutation, here's what we do:

n = 4 a = 1 2 3 4 divide 15 by (n-1)!

we get 15/6 = 2, reminder = 3.

So the permutation starts with a[2] = 3.

a = 1 2 4 take the reminder, divide by (n-2)!

we get 3/2 = 1, reminder = 1.

so the permutation is now permutation, a[1] = 3, 2

a = 1 4 take the reminder, divide by (n-1)!

we get 1/1 = 1, reminder = 0

so the permutation is now permutation, a[1] = 3, 2, 4.

do until reminder is zero. print a[0]= 3, 2, 4, 1.

^ this is the most efficient way to generate the kth permutation of any series.

You can use BigInteger math to perform this method very efficiently.

share|improve this answer
    
I forgot to add the permutation is repeatable. Thus 1, 2, 3, 4 is actually 256 possible combinations. –  Kevin Jun 11 '12 at 4:34
    
That's easier to do ... Instead of the factorial, it'll be n^k i.e. dividing by n at each step. –  Karthik Kumar Viswanathan Jun 11 '12 at 8:39
    
you don't need array lookup for every value to use this general approach. if the number ranges are 1-100 and 1,000,000 - 100,000,000 with two numbers, say, use a counter with from 0 to (99,000,100)**2-1, converting to values in 0-99,000,099. if the value < 100 then add 1, else add 999,900. you can generalise that quite easily - it needs storage proportional to the number of ranges, not the number of values. –  andrew cooke Aug 7 '12 at 12:48

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