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You have two application that need to exchange information among them in a local area network. The first application uses TCP for communication while the second uses UDP. Can we link both applications directly? If your answer is no, explain how we can link them?

(from a homework assignment)

I think the answer is no, we need to use some translator or middleware between them. But what?

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The choice of word link is overly unhelpful here, I would hope the intention is for both applications to be able to communicate with each other. –  Steve-o Oct 22 '12 at 14:56

1 Answer 1

As you figured out, you can't simply combine 2 types of connections into one. TCP is a state-full connection, which requires two computers to establish the connection, opposing to UDP which is stateless/connectionless connection that requires just one computer, send and forget style.

If you want them to communicate with each other, you must have a middle-ware.

The TCP application should have a TCP Client and TCP Server The Middle-ware should have a TCP Server that will listen to the TCP application's client and establish connection and a TCP Client that will establish connection with the TCP application's server.

Now the middle-ware can fully communicate with the TCP Application.

In order to do so with the UDP Application, you should listen to UDP at a certain port in order to listen to incoming data from the UDP Application, and send to it over UDP to the UDP Applicaiton (the UDP Application need to listen on that port)

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nice and clear answer =) Thank you very much –  السحر الحلال Jun 11 '12 at 14:02
    
It's not clear to me. What's the middleware for exactly? –  EJP Jun 12 '12 at 0:29
    
Bad choice of terminology, either of proxy, gateway, or bridge would be more appropriate. –  Steve-o Oct 22 '12 at 15:00

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