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How would I pass a global var in two external scripts?

<div>
<!-- INCLUDEPHP 1.php -->
</div>
<div>
<!-- INCLUDEPHP 2.php -->
</div>

I have tried creating global variables on 1.php and `2.phpp but it didn't work.

1.php:

<?php
global $someVar;
$sql = ...;
$someVar= $db -> sql_query($sql);
?>

2.php:

<?php
global $someVar;
echo "$someVar";
?>

Am I doing something wrong?

share|improve this question
3  
what's the include code, http? or ? –  Dagon Jun 10 '12 at 20:45
1  
I don't think you should not be using Global variables(not good practice). You could potentially use $_SESSION, to undertake what you require though. –  Haroon Jun 10 '12 at 20:46
1  
@Haroon: NO NO NO NO NO! Don't use session just to communicate between scripts when building a page! –  Eric Jun 10 '12 at 20:47
    
its http code. INCLUDE '1.php' ; –  wtsang02 Jun 10 '12 at 20:48
1  
@wtsang02 can you give the exact code, im a little confused, if its local a normal var will work in an included file. –  Dagon Jun 10 '12 at 20:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would try including the scripts via PHP:

<div>
<?php require "1.php" ?>
</div>
<div>
<?php require "2.php" ?>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
This worked Thanks –  wtsang02 Jun 10 '12 at 21:00
1  
@wtsang02: What were you doing before‽ Was <!-- INCLUDEPHP 2.php --> your actual code? –  Eric Jun 10 '12 at 21:05
    
so the issue was, the syntax for include, noting to do with variables? –  Dagon Jun 10 '12 at 21:12
1  
@Eric Free upvotes... –  Bojangles Jun 10 '12 at 21:12
1  
@Eric Not enough global -1 ;-) –  PeeHaa Jun 10 '12 at 21:14

If both includes are loaded into the same page, and the variables exist already in the global scope, all your functions can access them with the global statement. Since everything is already global, the statement is not required in the global scope, only inside functions. This also permits functions to share variables by casting them onto the global scope.

There are many dangers to this, though, which I'll not pretend to be fully aware of, so one is best advised to make prudent use of the global scope in large complex applications as they can become very volatile if naming conventions are relaxed.

Basically, we're looking at,

function arrow() { global $a; $a = "arrow"; return $a; }
function sky() { global $b; $b = "sky"; return $b; }
echo "I shot an " . arrow() . " into the " . sky() . ".";
echo "I shot an $a into the $b.";

which is child's play, it demonstrates how exposed the variables are, sitting out there with no protection. Now another function can come along and blow the whole thing apart:

function whammo() { global $a, $b; $c = $a; $a = $b; $b = $c;}
echo "I shot an " . arrow() . " into the " . sky() . ".";
whammo();
echo "I shot an $a into the $b.";

See what I mean?

Your solution probably lies in a closure of some sort, wherein all the functions are contained that need this 'global'. It will be much better protected.

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