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Edit2: Yay, found the problem, there is actually an error in the ajax call, and because of my stupidity, I didn't realise that both the methods - success and error can be ran (I thought it was either one or the other), so formComplete was being set to false every time because there was an error.

Appreciate the time you gave & tip about not using global variable names as function parameters.

Edit: Here's the code where formComplete is set (console.log()'s to check formComplete throughout the process):

validate: function(field) {
            if(!field.val()) {
                formComplete = false;
                // formComplete is false here
                console.log(formComplete);
            }
            else {
                if(field.attr('name') === 'queryEmail') {
                    // Validate the email
                    if(DMOFFAT.helper.validateEmail(field.val()) === true){
                        // formComplete is either true or false here, depending on the last validation carried out
                        console.log(formComplete);
                        formComplete = true;
                        // formComplete is true here
                        console.log(formComplete);
                    }
                    else {
                        formComplete = false;
                        // formComplete is false here
                        console.log(formComplete);
                    }
                }
                else {
                    formComplete = true;
                    // formComplete is true here
                    console.log(formComplete);
                }

            }
        },

Question: Why is this variable (formComplete) going from true to false?

I've written some basic form validation for a contact form, here's how I've done it:

Defined the fields like so:

var queryTypeField = $('#queryType'),
    queryMessageField = $('#queryMessage'),
    queryEmailField = $('#queryEmail'),
    queryNameField = $('#queryName'),
    submitButton = $('#submit');

Adding some event handlers to these like so (FWIW, DMOFFAT variable is just an object which holds different modules of the code e.g. contactForm = contact form javascript etc.):

    queryMessageField.on('blur', function() {
       DMOFFAT.contactForm.validate(queryMessageField);
    });

    queryNameField.on('blur', function() {
       DMOFFAT.contactForm.validate(queryNameField);
    });

    queryEmailField.on('blur', function() {
       DMOFFAT.contactForm.validate(queryEmailField);
    });       

    submitButton.on('click', function(evt) {
        evt.preventDefault();
        console.log('Click');
        console.log(formComplete);
        DMOFFAT.contactForm.send(formComplete);
    });

The validate function simply sets 'formComplete' to either true or false, depending on if the field is valid or not.

When my fields are all filled in correctly, formComplete = true.

As you can see from the last line of my code above, I pass formComplete (which is true) over to my send function. My send function simply checks the value of formComplete, and either sends the data off to a php script, or prints an error, here's the code:

        send: function(formComplete) {
        // This is true when the form is filled in correctly
        console.log('In send formComplete is...' + formComplete);
        if(formComplete === true) {
            // Extract form values
            formData['queryMessage'] = queryMessage.value;
            formData['queryType'] = queryType.value;
            formData['queryName'] = queryName.value;
            formData['queryEmail'] = queryEmail.value;
           $.ajax({
                type: 'POST',
                async: true,
                url: '....',
                dataType: 'json',
                data: formData,
                success: function(data, status, xhr) {
                    DMOFFAT.contactForm.writeMessage(formComplete);
                },
                error: function(xhr, status, err) {
                    DMOFFAT.contactForm.writeMessage(formComplete);
                }
            });

        }
        else {
            this.writeMessage(formComplete);
        }

Now, I KNOW that formComplete is true when the form is filled in correctly, because my php script creates a .txt file with the data in, if it was false, this file wouldn't be created.

This means that we send the value of formComplete off to writeMessage, which simply writes out some HTML to the page to display whether the submission was successful or not, here's the code:

 // Disgusting spaghetti code
    writeMessage: function(formComplete) {
        // This is false now...
        console.log('In writeMessage formComplete is...' + formComplete);
        if(formComplete === true) {
            contactFormElement.html('<div class="success ui-message cf-message"><p><strong>Thank you</strong> for your query, we\'ll get back to you as soon as we can.</p></div>');
        }
        else {
            // Check if there's already an error, otherwise many will appear
            if(errorElement === '') {
                errorElement = '<div class="error ui-message cf-message"><p>' + this.config.errorMsg + '</p></div>';
                contactFormElement.prepend(errorElement);   
            }
        }
    }

formComplete itself is defined like so:

var formComplete;

When I inspect formComplete on the first line of writeMessage, it's now false, I cannot find out why though...even when I explicitly set formComplete to true before it's passed to writeMessage, it's still false.

TLDR: Tell me where I'm being stupid please :)

PS: I know I could use a pre-built contact form validation plugin, but wanted to try build something simple myself.

share|improve this question
    
you are sending formComplete to DMOFFAT.contactForm.writeMessage();. Is it the same kind of object you are defining writeMessage in? –  Dvir Azulay Jun 10 '12 at 21:14
    
You're doing some funny things there by having a global variable with the same name as a function parameter ... that's not wrong or invalid, but inside that function it's the local parameter that'll be referenced, not the global variable. –  Pointy Jun 10 '12 at 21:15
2  
Is formComplete defined globally? –  chucktator Jun 10 '12 at 21:16
3  
Also you haven't posted any code where the variable is actually updated ... –  Pointy Jun 10 '12 at 21:16
    
@chucktator yes, it is –  Daniel Jun 10 '12 at 21:50

1 Answer 1

The problem is, that you are calling writeMessage() from a callback function for your AJAX request, so the interpreter is looking for a global variable on execution time. Anyway, you can simply pass true to writeMessage() in your callback functions, as the calls are only executed if formComplete is true-

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