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I currently have an application I'm writing in c# (using .NET) that requires me to start a timer as soon as a user sees an image on screen up until they respond with a key press.

Now I realise that practically this is very difficult given the monitor input lag and response time, the time the keyboard takes to physically send the message, the OS to process it, etc.

But I'm trying my best to reduce it down to mostly a constant error (the response time results will be used to compare one user to the next so a constant error isn't really an issue). However annoying hurdle is the variable caused by the monitor refresh rate, as I gather when my onPaint message is called and done with, it doesn't mean the image has actually been processed and sent from the graphics buffer?

Unfortunately time restrictions and other commitments would realistically restrict me to continuing this task in c# for windows.

So what I was wondering was if either handling all the drawing in OpenGL or DirectX or better still for me if it is possible to just using either OpenGL or DirectX to create an event when the screen is updated?

Another suggestion given to me previously was regarding V-Sync, if I switch this off is the image sent as soon as it is drawn? as opposed to sending images at a set rate synchronised to the monitor refresh rate?

share|improve this question
1  
What precision do you need for your timer? – Martin Delille Jun 10 '12 at 21:42
    
as precise as possible if I could achieve within 1ms that would be ideal! I'm currently using the Stopwatch which as I understand it is just a wrapper for the precision timer, I am also running the timer in a separate thread elevated to high priority (with the application running at the same priority but other threads dropped to normal, the application will run with an absolute minimum of other applications and processes in the background) – aceaudio Jun 10 '12 at 22:11
    
Anything worse than 10ms may very well become quite an issue! – aceaudio Jun 10 '12 at 22:18
    
You are measuring human response? Anyways, use the System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch class, start it when you display the image (using whatever code that will cause it to show), then stop it when the user hits a button. How much precision do you really need? The error from actual display on a 60fps monitor, is about 7msecs on average from the time you initiate the display in code (yes this is a simplification). – Chris O Jun 10 '12 at 22:40
    
Thanks for the reply Chris indeed it is human response for a psychology experiment, and I'm doing all of that so far. The kind of response time expected isn't very fast BUT the difference in time between different variables is, meaning a variable of 0-17ms (@60hz) could certainly have an impact on the results. I realise that on average it's not a huge amount and with enough data collected this shouldn't be a massive issue but if there is a way I could synchronise the drawing of each screen to the refresh rate of the display in some way to increase accuracy then I think it would be wise. – aceaudio Jun 10 '12 at 23:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You must render your graphic in a separate thread in order to:

  • Use vertical synchronisation to have a precise timing of the effective display of your image.
  • Get the precise timing of your user input (since user interface is not on the same thread than the render loop.

Initialise Direct3D to enable the VSync during render :

// DirectX example
presentParams.SwapEffect = SwapEffect.Discard;
presentParams.BackBufferCount = 1;
presentParams.PresentationInterval = PresentInterval.One;

device = new Device(...

Perform the render in a separate thread:

Thread renderThread = new Thread(RenderLoop);
renderThread.Start();

shouldDisplayImageEvent = new AutoResetEvent();

Then use the following render loop:

void RenderLoop()
{
    while(applicationActive)
    {
          device.BeginScene();

        // Other rendering task

        if (shouldDisplayImageEvent.WaitOne(0))
        {
            // Render image
            // ...

            userResponseStopwatch = new Stopwatch();
            userResponseStopwatch.Start();
        }

        device.EndScene();

        device.Present();
    }
}

Then handle the user input :

void OnUserInput(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (userResponseStopwatch != null)
    {
        userResponseStopwatch.Stop();

        float userResponseDuration = userResponseStopwatch.ElapsedMillisecond - 1000 / device.DisplayMode.RefreshRate - displayDeviceDelayConstant;
        userResponseStopwatch = null;
    }
}

You now use the shouldDisplayImageEvent.Set() event trigger to display the image as needed and start the stop watch.

share|improve this answer
    
I think get it now! thank you very much for your patience and time. I'll give this a go! I take it there would be no obligation to use DirectX to render the images I could just continue to use my existing code to display images, however now I know that the time between executing the code to display the image, and the image being displayed, is constant. Right? – aceaudio Jun 12 '12 at 15:03
    
Looks as thou that's working for me, many thanks again, much appreciated. – aceaudio Jun 12 '12 at 16:12
    
You're welcome! I've received so much help from SO user that when I can give a hand I do it :) – Martin Delille Jun 12 '12 at 18:28
    
The time is constant if you use vertical synchronisation. – Martin Delille Jun 12 '12 at 18:28

First enable the VSync on your application idle loop :

// DirectX example
presentParams.SwapEffect = SwapEffect.Discard;
presentParams.BackBufferCount = 1;
presentParams.PresentationInterval = PresentInterval.One;

device = new Device(...

Application.Idle += new EventHandler(OnApplicationIdle);

// More on this here : http://blogs.msdn.com/tmiller/archive/2005/05/05/415008.aspx
internal void OnApplicationIdle(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Msg msg = new Msg();
    while (true)
    {
        if (PeekMessage(out msg, IntPtr.Zero, 0, 0, 0))
            break;
    }

    // Clearing render
    // ...

    if (displayImage)
    {
        // Render image
        // ...

        renderTime = DateTime.now();
    }
    device.Present();
}

With the vsync enabled, the device.Present function block until the next frame synchronisation, so if you compute the time between renderTime and the user input time and remove the display device delay + 16.67ms you should get your user response delay.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to post. Your have to excuse my ignorance, but I'm not sure I've quite understood how this works yet. Is it that by setting: presentParams.SwapEffect = SwapEffect.Discard; presentParams.BackBufferCount = 1; presentParams.PresentationInterval = PresentInterval.One; we are saying that the image must first been written to a backbuffer, of which on the following cycle it will be written to the display? Then by using a while loop with peakmessage we are checking if this has been written to the display, by testing that there are no longer any messages in the que? – aceaudio Jun 11 '12 at 14:53
    
Ok maybe I'm starting to understand this Present() copies the back buffer to the front buffer right? and I'm guessing isn't released from the que until this is complete? but if so shouldn't the timer be started after the while loop but before attempting to render the image as it isn't actually displayed at that point. – aceaudio Jun 11 '12 at 16:05
    
I don't believe Present has well-defined blocking behaviour. In practice, you will probably end up synced to the monitor's refresh rate, but that will be because the driver repeatedly hits some queueing limit which only gets relieved when a frame is pulled out for display at the end of the pipeline (which will happen every v-sync) – dave Jun 11 '12 at 20:25
    
The Present() method copy the back buffer to the front buffer then wait for the vsync event (about 16.67ms if the app is idle). when the vsync event occurs, the front buffer is effectively displayed on the screen. In this process you must consider that all the operations duration can be neglected compared to this Present() operation. – Martin Delille Jun 11 '12 at 20:35
    
@dave it is blocking: if you put a Stopwatch before and after the Present() operation you will meter 16ms for 60Hz display. – Martin Delille Jun 11 '12 at 20:39

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