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Assume this code works:

left '*'
left '+'

expr: expr '+' expr
    | expr '*' expr
    ;

I want to define an other precedence marker like:

left MULTIPLY
left PLUS

expr: expr '+' expr %prec PLUS
    | expr '*' expr %prec MULTIPLY
    ;

Yet this is not actually effective.

I suppose these two forms should be equivalent, however, they're not.

It's not on practical problem. I just want to know the reason and the principle for this phenomenon.

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You say you are not trying to solve a specific, practical problem. And from your question, I'm a little confused about how you are trying to use the precedence marker.

I think you will find that you don't need to use the precedence marker often. It is usually simpler, and clearer to the reader, to rewrite your grammar so that precedence is explicitly accounted for. To give multiply and divide higher precedence than add and subtract, you can do something like this (example adapted from John Levine, lex & yacc 2/e, 1992):

%token NAME NUMBER

%%

stmt : NAME '=' expr
     | expr
     ;

expr : expr '+' term
     | expr '-' term
     | term
     ;

term : term '*' factor
     | term '/' factor
     | factor
     ;

factor : '(' expr ')'
       | '-' factor
       | NUMBER
       ;

In your example, PLUS and MULTIPLY are not real tokens; you can't use them interchangeably with '+' and '*'. Levine calls them pseudo-tokens. They are there to link your productions back to your list of precedences that you have defined with %left and %nonassoc declarations. He gives this example of how you might use %prec to give unary minus high precedence even though the '-' token has low precedence:

%token NAME NUMBER
%left '-' '+'
%left '*' '/'
%nonassoc UMINUS

%%

stmt : NAME '=' expr
     | expr
     ;

expr : expr '+' expr
     | expr '-' expr
     | expr '*' expr
     | expr '/' expr
     | '-' expr %prec UMINUS
     | '(' expr ')'
     | NUMBER
     ;

To sum up, I would recommend following the pattern of my first code example rather than the second; make the grammar explicit.

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Shift-reduce conflicts are a conflict between trying to reduce a production versus shifting a token and moving to the nest state. When Bison is resolving a conflict its not comparing two rules and choosing one of them - its comparing one rule that it wants to reduce and the token that you want to shift in the other rule(s). This might be clearer if you have two rules to shift:

expr: expr '+' expr
    | expr '*' expr
    | expr '*' '*' expr

The reason this is all confusing is that the way Bison gives a precedence to the "reduce" rule is to associate it with a token (the last terminal in the rule by default or the token from the prec declaration) and then it uses the precedence table to compares that token to the token you are trying to shift. Basically, prec declarations only make sense for the "reduce" part of a conflict and they are not counted for the shift part.

One way to see this is with the following grammar

command: IF '(' expr ')' command               %prec NOELSE
       : IF '(' expr ')' command ELSE command

In this grammar you need to choose between reducing the first rule or shifting the ELSE token. You do this by either giving precedences to the ')' token and to the ELSE token or by using a prec declaration and giving a precedence for NOELSE instead of ')'. If you try to give a prec declaration to the second it will get ignored and Bison will continue trying to look for the precedence of the ELSE token in the precedence table.

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Yacc precedence rules aren't really about the precedence of expressions, though they can be used for that. Instead, they are a way of resolving shift/reduce conflicts (and ONLY shift/reduce conflicts) explicitly.

Understanding how it works requires understanding how shift/reduce (bottom up) parsing works. The basic idea is that you read token symbols from the input and push ("shift") those tokens onto a stack. When the symbols on the top of the stack match the right hand side of some rule in the grammar, you may "reduce" the rule, popping the symbols from the stack and replacing them with a single symbol from the left side of the rule. You repeat this process, shifting tokens and reducing rules until you've read the entire input and reduced it to a single instance of the start symbol, at which point you've successfully parsed the entire input.

The essential problem with the above (and what the whole machinery of the parser generator is solving) is knowing when to reduce a rule vs when to shift a token if both are possible. The parser generator (yacc or bison) builds a state machine that tracks which symbols have been shifted and so knows what 'partially matched' rules are currently possible and limits shifts just to those tokens that can match more of such a rule. This does not work if the grammar in question is not LALR(1), and so in such cases yacc/bsion reports shift/reduce or reduce/reduce conflicts.

The that precedence rules work to resolve shift reduce conflicts is by assigning a precedence to certain tokens and rules in the grammar. Whenever there is a shift/reduce conflict between a token to be shifted and a rule to be reduced, and BOTH have a precedence it will do whichever one has higher precedence. If they have the SAME precedence, then it looks at the %left/%right/%nonassoc flag associated with the precedence level -- %left means reduce, %right means shift, and %nonassoc means do neither and treat it as a syntax error.

The only tricky remaining bit is how tokens and rules get their precedence. Tokens get theirs from the %left/%right/%nonassoc directive they are in, which also sets the ordering. Rules get precedence from a %prec directive OR from the right-most terminal on their right-hand-side. So when you have:

%left '*'
%left '+'

expr: expr '+' expr
    | expr '*' expr
    ;

You are setting the precedence of '*' and '+' with the %left directives, and the two rules get their precedence from those tokens.

When you have:

%left MULTIPLY
%left PLUS

expr: expr '+' expr %prec PLUS
    | expr '*' expr %prec MULTIPLY
    ;

You are setting the precedence of the tokens MULTIPLY and PLUS and then explicitly setting the rules to have those precedences. However you are NOT SETTING ANY PRECEDENCE for the tokens '*' and '+'. So when there is a shift/reduce conflict between one of the two rules and either '*' or '+', precedence does not resolve it because the token has no precedence.

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