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Ie., why does the following work:

    char* char_array(size_t size){
            return new char[size];
    }

    int main(){
            const char* foo = "foo";
            size_t len = strlen(foo);
            char* bar=char_array(len);
            memset(bar, 0, len+1);
    }

But the following segfaults:

    void char_array(char* out, size_t size){
            out= new char[size];
    }

    int main(){
            const char* foo = "foo";
            size_t len = strlen(foo);
            char* bar;
            char_array(bar, len);
            memset(bar, 0, len+1);
    }
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possible duplicate of malloc memory to a pointer to pointer –  AndreyT Jun 10 '12 at 22:32
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Passing 'bar' to char_array is passing a copy of the present value of that pointer at the time of the call - so 'out' in char_array points to the same thing as 'bar' but they're completely isolated variables, and when char_array returns the newly allocated value is simply lost.

If you want to actually modify the 'bar' variable, you need to pass a pointer or reference to the bar variable itself, i.e.

void char_array(char** out, size_t size) {
    *out = new char[size];
}

...
char_array(&bar, len);

or

void char_array(char*& out, size_t size) {
    out = new char[size];
}

...
char_array(bar, len);
...
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Ahha, yes. Silly mistake. Thanks :) –  bitgarden Jun 10 '12 at 22:38
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You're not modifying out, you need to pass the pointer by reference:

void char_array(char*& out, size_t size)
//                   |
//           pass by reference

Right now you're calling memset on an uninitialized pointer.

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 0 void char_array(char* out, size_t size)
 1 {
 2    out = new char[size];
 3 }

 5 int main()
 6 {
 7    const char* foo = "foo";
 8    size_t len = strlen(foo);
 9    char* bar;
10    char_array(bar, len);
11    memset(bar, 0, len+1);
12 }

char* bar at line 9 is not initialised, so declares a pointer variable that can point anywhere. Line 10 calls char_array, copying that garbage pointer value to the out parameter. Note that it's the garbage value from within bar that's copied - out gets the value but has no inherent connection to bar. This garbage value is never used - it's just overwritten with the pointer returned by new on line 2, then discarded as the function returns.

To allow char_array to change bar itself, either use a reference to a pointer:

void char_array(char*& out, size_t size) { out = new ... }

...or a pointer to a pointer...

void char_array(char** p_out, size_t size) { *p_out = new ... }

char_array(&bar, len);

Either way char_array knows where bar is to modify it.

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