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When I first made this query and the table was relatively small, it ran very quickly, but over time as the update table size increased (now about 6000 rows) the query has been extrememly slow and resource intensive. The server I'm using is the 1GB RAM VPS from linode.com, and I haven't actually waited long enough for the query to finish.

Interestingly, without the extra condition in the left join (SELECT MAX(u2.time)) it runs in < 0.5s.

I had a look in the process list of mySQL while the query was running, and it showed as 'Sending Data' for the whole time

Here's the query:

SELECT 
  s.ID as sid, s.country AS country, 
  s.name AS name, s.ip AS ip, 
  u.connPlayers AS cp, u.maxPlayers AS mp
FROM servers AS s 

LEFT JOIN updates AS u 
  ON u.serverID = s.ID 
  AND u.time = 
      (SELECT MAX(u2.time) 
         FROM updates AS u2 
         WHERE u2.serverID = s.ID) 
ORDER BY RAND(MINUTE(NOW())) 
LIMIT 0,10

And here's the my.cnf file: http://redream.co.nz/my.cnf

Table structure:

Servers table (20 rows )

Field   Type
ID      int(10) Unique Key           
ip      varchar(200)                 
country varchar(2)               
name    varchar(600)             
motd    varchar(600)                 
desc    mediumtext               
version varchar(600)    

Update table (6000 rows)

Field       Type
serverID    int(10)              
ping        int(10)              
time        int(14)              
uptime      int(10)              
connPlayers int(10)              
maxPlayers  int(10)              
uptime      int(14)
share|improve this question
    
Can you give more info about the table structure? What indexes do you have? What data types are the columns? – loganfsmyth Jun 11 '12 at 0:58
    
added table structure to the main post – Redream Jun 11 '12 at 1:11
    
how many rows in each table? – ObscureRobot Jun 11 '12 at 1:16
    
20 in the servers table, and 6000 in the updates table. – Redream Jun 11 '12 at 1:19
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I am no MySQL expert, but I think this will work for MySQL:

SELECT 
  s.ID as sid, s.country AS country, 
  s.name AS name, s.ip AS ip, 
  u.connPlayers AS cp, u.maxPlayers AS mp
FROM servers AS s 

LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT u.serverId, u.connPlayers, u.maxPlayers
    FROM updates u
    INNER JOIN (SELECT serverId, max(time) AS 'maxTime' FROM updates GROUP BY serverId) AS u2
        ON u.serverId = u2.serverId AND u.time = u2.maxTime 
) AS u ON u.serverID = s.ID 

ORDER BY RAND(MINUTE(NOW())) 
LIMIT 0,10

The important change is that the left join now contains the following subquery:

SELECT u.serverId, u.connPlayers, u.maxPlayers
FROM updates u
INNER JOIN (SELECT serverId, max(time) AS 'maxTime' FROM updates GROUP BY serverId) AS u2
    ON u.serverId = u2.serverId AND u.time = u2.maxTime 

This subquery again contains a subquery and returns for each serverId the row with the maximum time value. The above subquery is only executed once instead of for each row in the cross product.

share|improve this answer
1  
good idea for now. I'm pretty sure that subqueries can't be indexed in MySQL, so eventually this is going to blow up too, once updates gets large enough. – ObscureRobot Jun 11 '12 at 2:06
    
@ObscureRobot: I don't think this will be a problem in this case. The usual problem is that the result of a subquery is stored in an in-memory table. This in-memory table will not have indexes, which can be a problem if this table is big. In this case the subquery will return at most 1 row for each server. My guess is that the number of servers will not grow very fast. – Elian Ebbing Jun 11 '12 at 2:29
    
Good point, but you are still effectively doing a cross product of updates with itself. For each row in updates, you have to do a table scan to find the MAX(time). So as updates grows, the subquery continues to grow in cost. – ObscureRobot Jun 11 '12 at 2:38

The subquery Select MAX(... is being run for each row of the cross product of updates and servers cross product of servers and updates and then updates again. MySQL's optimizer is not very sophisticated.

Update: my SQL is a bit rusty, but you might try something like this:

SELECT
  /* blah */
FROM
  servrs s
LEFT JOIN
  updates u
ON
  u.serverID = s.ID
GROUP BY s.serverID
HAVING MAX(u.time)

I don't have a MySQL instance handy, so you are probably going to have to tweak this a bit to make it work.

Update2: after taking a closer look at the code, I think the cost of this query is greater than my original estimate. Updated the top of this answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Ouch. Didn't know that. +1. – Eric J. Jun 11 '12 at 1:19
    
Is there any alternative to left joining the latest update row without the 100% CPU? – Redream Jun 11 '12 at 1:21
    
you could store the relevant rows in a temporary table, and then left join those against servers. – ObscureRobot Jun 11 '12 at 1:25
    
Note: be sure to use an actual table, not a view. The view may be re-queried every time it is used. (I'm not sure it is still that bad, but it has been that way in the past) – ObscureRobot Jun 11 '12 at 1:26

6000 rows is tiny for MySQL running on the platform you describe.

The very first thing I would check is your my.ini file. Are you using one of the out-of-the-box files (which are WAY underconfigured for modern servers)? If that is the case, the initial answer is to edit my.ini to allocate reasonable amounts of memory to MySQL.

If you need help with that, post your my.ini file (less any passwords) as there are a number of things there that could cause this type of slow performance.

Also, when the query was running faster (when the rows in updates were much less), how many rows would be returned by your query compared to the number of rows in updates at the time?

How many rows are in servers currently?

share|improve this answer
    
There are currently 20 rows in the servers table. When it was much faster, there were 10 rows being returned from 20 server rows and 40 updates (roughly) – Redream Jun 11 '12 at 1:16

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