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I am working with the YouTube iFrame API to embed a number of videos on a page. Documentation here: https://developers.google.com/youtube/iframe_api_reference#Requirements

In summary, you load the API asynchronously using the following snippet:

 var tag = document.createElement('script');
 tag.src = "http://www.youtube.com/player_api";
 var firstScriptTag = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
 firstScriptTag.parentNode.insertBefore(tag, firstScriptTag);

Once loaded, the API fires the predefined callback function onYouTubePlayerAPIReady.

For additional context: I am defining a library file for this in Google Closure. I am providing a namespace: goog.provide('yt.video');

I then use goog.exportSymbol so that the API can find the function. That all works fine.

My challenge is that I would like to pass 2 variables to the callback function. Is there any way to do this without defining these 2 variables in the context of the window object?

goog.provide('yt.video');

goog.require('goog.dom');

yt.video = function(videos, locales) {
  this.videos = videos;
  this.captionLocales = locales;

  this.init();
};

yt.video.prototype.init = function() {
  var tag = document.createElement('script');
  tag.src = "http://www.youtube.com/player_api";
  var firstScriptTag = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
  firstScriptTag.parentNode.insertBefore(tag, firstScriptTag);
};

/*
 * Callback function fired when YT API is ready
 * This is exported using goog.exportSymbol in another file and
 * is being fired by the API properly.
 */
 yt.video.prototype.onPlayerReady = function(videos, locales) {
    window.console.log('this :' + this); //logs window
    window.console.log('this.videos : ' + this.videos); //logs undefined
    /*
     * Video settings from Django variable
     */
    for(i=0; i<this.videos.length; i++) {
      var playerEvents = {};
      var embedVars = {};

      var el = this.videos[i].el;
      var playerVid = this.videos[i].vid;
      var playerWidth = this.videos[i].width;
      var playerHeight = this.videos[i].height;
      var captionLocales = this.videos[i].locales;
      if(this.videos[i].playerVars)
        var embedVars = this.videos[i].playerVars;
      }
      if(this.videos[i].events) {
        var playerEvents = this.videos[i].events;
      }

      /*
       * Show captions by default
       */
      if(goog.array.indexOf(captionLocales, 'es') >= 0) {
        embedVars.cc_load_policy = 1;
      };

      new YT.Player(el, {
        height: playerHeight,
        width: playerWidth,
        videoId: playerVid,
        events: playerEvents,
        playerVars: embedVars
    });
 };

};

To intialize this, I am currently using the following within a self-executing anonymous function:

  var videos = [
    {"vid": "video_id", "el": "player-1", "width": 640, "height": 390, "locales": ["es", "fr"], "events": {"onStateChange": stateChanged}}, 
    {"vid": "video_id", "el": "player-2", "locales": ["es", "fr"], "width": 640, "height": 390}
  ];

  var locales = ['es'];

  var videoTemplate = new yt.video(videos, locales);
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2 Answers

How about defining onYouTubePlayerAPIReady as a global function like how the API expects it and then call your onPlayerReady method from inside that function? Code sample:

window.onYouTubePlayerAPIReady = function () {
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
    args.push(videos, locales);
    videoTemplate.onPlayerReady.apply(videoTemplate, args);
};

And you modify the signature of onPlayerReady method to accept arguments in the same order

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response! This is a clever idea. If I wanted to avoid modifying window for this, can you think of any other solution? I guess I am stuck with this approach if the API assumes the window.onYouTubePlayerAPIReady, correct? –  djreed Jun 11 '12 at 5:03
1  
Yeah, I think if the API expects the definition like that, there might not be another approach that I can think of. If you're worried about polluting the global namespace (window in this case), you can always nullify the onYouTubePlayerAPIReady after it is done with the job, i.e, window.onYouTubePlayerAPIReady = null as the last line inside onYouTubePlayerAPIReady method –  Sudhee G Jun 11 '12 at 5:09
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To answer your specific question:

My challenge is that I would like to pass 2 variables to the callback function. Is there any way to do this without defining these 2 variables in the context of the window object?

Yes, there are ways to provide data to a callback function without using global variables. However, before looking at the callback function, the YouTube API has the following requirement:

In addition, any HTML page that contains the YouTube player must implement a JavaScript function named onYouTubePlayerReady. The API will call this function when the player is fully loaded and the API is ready to receive calls.

The YouTube API examples add event listeners within the onYouTubePlayerReady function as shown here:

function onYouTubePlayerAPIReady() {
  var player;
  player = new YT.Player('player', {
    width: 1280,
    height: 720,
    videoId: 'u1zgFlCw8Aw',
    events: {
      'onReady': onPlayerReady,
      'onPlaybackQualityChange': onPlayerPlaybackQualityChange,
      'onStateChange': onPlayerStateChange,
      'onError': onPlayerError
    }
  });
} 

It appears that your example callback function yt.video.prototype.onPlayerReady is intended to be an event listener for the YouTube API event onReady emitted by a YouTube YT.Player object. The API docs indicate that event listeners are added either when constructing the YT.Player object or added using the addEventListener function (the Closure Library alternative is goog.events.listen).

Since the yt.video.prototype.onPlayerReady event listener needs to "listen" for the onReady event emitted from a YouTube YT.Player object, it would be circular to construct new YT.Player instances within the event listener yt.video.prototype.onPlayerReady intended to listen for an event emitted by a YT.Player instance.

Getting back to the original question of providing data to callback functions without using global variables, you cannot pass arbitrary function arguments to an event listener (for example, in the original code sample above, yt.video.prototype.onPlayerReady must accept an Event object as its first argument rather than a videos array). However, the event listener yt.video.prototype.onPlayerReady can be used as a callback function and still access the state of yt.video instance objects as long as it is bound to instances of yt.video.

One way to bind the this argument to a specific object is with the Closure Library function goog.bind(functionToCall, selfObject, var_args). The yt.video constructor could be modified as follows:

goog.provide('yt.video');

goog.require('goog.dom');

/**
 * @constructor
 */
yt.video = function(videos, locales) {
  this.videos = videos;
  this.captionLocales = locales;

  this.onPlayerReadyListener = goog.bind(this.onPlayerReady, this);

  this.init();
};

yt.video.prototype.init = function() {
  var tag = document.createElement('script');
  tag.src = "http://www.youtube.com/player_api";
  var firstScriptTag = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
  firstScriptTag.parentNode.insertBefore(tag, firstScriptTag);
};

/*
 * Callback function fired when YT API is ready
 * This is exported using goog.exportSymbol in another file and
 * is being fired by the API properly.
 */
yt.video.prototype.onPlayerReady = function(event) {
  // Logs [object Object]
  window.console.log('this :' + this);

  // Logs [object Object],[object Object]
  window.console.log('this.videos : ' + this.videos); 

  event.target.playVideo();
};


Then the bound event listener could be added to a YT.Player object as follows:

var myVideoObject = new yt.video(videos, locales);

function onYouTubePlayerAPIReady() {
  var player;
  player = new YT.Player('player', {
    width: 1280,
    height: 720,
    videoId: 'u1zgFlCw8Aw',
    events: {
      'onReady': myVideoObject.onPlayerReadyListener
    }
  });
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response! I had given bind a try actually. this.onPlayerReadyListener = goog.bind(this.onPlayerReady, this); does not seem to work. this.video is still undefined from within yt.video.prototype.onPlayerReady. Any idea why? –  djreed Jun 11 '12 at 5:02
    
@djreed: See updated code sample above based on testing in Chrome. Inside yt.video.prototype.onPlayerReady, this.videos now successfully logs [object Object],[object Object] instead of undefined. The event listener for onStateChange has been changed to yt.onPlayerStateChange. Also, as a matter of style, it might be good to use a different namespace for your library (yt versus YT could be confusing). –  Christopher Peisert Jun 11 '12 at 6:50
    
Can you explain why you've added the function onYouTubePlayerAPIReady? This function is already defined as yt.video.prototype.onPlayerReady –  djreed Jun 11 '12 at 16:40
1  
@djreed I updated the answer to explain the YouTube API requirement of defining a function named onYouTubePlayerAPIReady as well as clarifying the mechanics of the event handler. –  Christopher Peisert Jun 12 '12 at 4:48
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