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Are there any functions are available for converting all newlines in a string to spaces?

For example:

$a = "dflsdgjsdg
dsfsd 
gf 
sgd 
g  
sdg
sdf
gsd";

The result is am looking for is:

$a = "dflsdgjsdg dsfsd gf sgd g sdg sdf gsd"
share|improve this question
    
is there anything for wrong in questions for down vote ? – joe Jul 8 '09 at 11:53
    
I asked this question i thought s// will be more time . thats y i asked .is there any other way of doing – joe Jul 8 '09 at 13:15
3  
Although they aren't strictly reserved or locked, you should avoid using $a and $b as ordinary variables in Perl. They're automatically used by Perl's sort function, so it's best to leave them alone otherwise. – Telemachus Jul 8 '09 at 20:24
1  
+1 This question is basic. There are answers giving several possible solutions. There are explanations why one may be better than the others. An answer with the best performance without any obfuscation has floated to the top by up votes. Having the question and answers here helps to fulfill this: "finding the right answer to your programming questions should be as easy as falling into the pit of success", from the SO About page. – C.W.Holeman II Jun 2 '10 at 14:28
up vote 14 down vote accepted

I would recommend restricting the use of $a and $b to sort routines only.

For your question, tr/// is more appropriate than s///:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $x = q{dflsdgjsdg
dsfsd
gf
sgd
g
sdg
sdf
gsd};

$x =~ tr{\n}{ };

print $x, "\n";
__END__

Output:

C:\Temp> ttt
dflsdgjsdg dsfsd gf sgd g sdg sdf gsd

Update: I do not think TMTOWTDI justifies using anything other than tr/// here. First, semantically, what the OP is asking for is transliteration and therefore it makes sense to use transliteration. Second, at least on my Windows XP laptop with 5.10, the benchmark module provides a clear contrast:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Benchmark qw( cmpthese );

use constant LONG_STRING => "\n" x 1_000_000;

cmpthese -10, {
    subst => sub {
        my $x = LONG_STRING;
        $x =~ s{\n}{ }g;
        return;
    },
    split_join => sub {
        my $x = LONG_STRING;
        $x = join ' ', split /\n/, $x;
        return;
    },
    tr => sub {
        my $x = LONG_STRING;
        $x =~ tr{\n}{ };
        return;
    },
    nop => sub {
        my $x = LONG_STRING;
        return;
    }
};
__END__

Results:

              Rate split_join      subst         tr        nop
split_join 0.354/s         --       -85%      -100%      -100%
subst       2.40/s       578%         --       -99%      -100%
tr           250/s     70514%     10320%         --       -92%
nop         3025/s    854076%    125942%      1110%         --

One more update: I should point out that the relative performance of tr/// to s/// depends on the size and composition of the source string. The case I chose for illustration here is definitely extreme. Using less extreme input strings, the performance ratio seems to be closer to 15:1 rather than 100:1 ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
It's a good idea to avoid $a and $b outside of sort. Since the OP might not know why those variables are special, I added a comment to his original question saying why (briefly). – Telemachus Jul 8 '09 at 20:27

This is a nice question because it embodies Perl's TMTOWTDI.

The answers above give 3 options, all of which are valid. I'll summarize them here.

The string is:

$a = "dflsdgjsdg
dsfsd 
gf 
sgd 
g  
sdg
sdf
gsd";

substitution

$a =~ s/\n/ /g;

transliteration

$a =~ tr/\n/ /;

split/join

$a = join " ", split "\n", $a;
share|improve this answer

how about substitition

$a = "dflsdgjsdg
dsfsd 
gf 
sgd 
g  
sdg
sdf
gsd";

$a =~ s/\n/ /g;
print $a;

or using split and join

@s =split /\n/,$a;
print join(" ",@s);
share|improve this answer
    
which one is faster substitution or split&join ? – joe Jul 8 '09 at 11:37
    
i haven't time it, but you can try for yourself using Benchmark module – ghostdog74 Jul 8 '09 at 11:46
    
for my string substitution is faster – joe Jul 8 '09 at 11:52

Try the following program:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $a = 'dflsdgjsdg
dsfsd
gf
sgd
g
sdg
sdf
gsd';
$a =~ s{\n}{ }g;

print $a;

The program simply uses a regular expression to search for newlines and replace them with spaces globally.

share|improve this answer
    
is the substitution is faster than other functions ? – joe Jul 8 '09 at 11:34
2  
Why don't you try it and find out? – friedo Jul 8 '09 at 11:47
    
for my operation substitution is faster – joe Jul 8 '09 at 11:52
    
I think you need to use the s modifier to treat the string as a multi-line string. – Nathan Fellman Jul 8 '09 at 19:35

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