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In C#, I can use the throw; statement to rethrow an exception while preserving the stack trace:

try
{
   ...
}
catch (Exception e)
{
   if (e is FooException)
     throw;
}

Is there something like this in Java (that doesn't lose the original stack trace)?

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Why do you think it looses the original stacktrace? The only way to loose it when you throw new SomeOtherException and forget to assign the root cause in the constructor or in initCause(). –  kd304 Jul 8 '09 at 12:34
2  
I believe this is how the code behaves in .Net, but I'm no longer positive. It might be worthwhile to either look it up somewhere or run a small test. –  ripper234 Jul 8 '09 at 15:03
3  
Throwables don't get modified by throwing them. To update the stack trace you have to call fillInStackTrace(). Conveniently this method gets called in the constructor of a Throwable. –  Robert Jul 27 '12 at 0:17
9  
In C#, yes, throw e; will lose the stacktrace. But not in Java. –  Tim Goodman Apr 22 '13 at 13:42
    
Some doc from Oracle about exceptions with Java 7 : Catching Multiple Exception Types and Rethrowing Exceptions with Improved Type Checking –  Guillaume Husta Jul 8 at 8:47

6 Answers 6

up vote 176 down vote accepted
catch (WhateverException e) {
    throw e;
}

will simply rethrow the exception you've caught (obviously the surrounding method has to permit this via its signature etc.). The exception will maintain the original stack trace.

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2  
Hi, InterruptedException e gives an unhandled Exception message when I add the throw e line. Not so if I replace it with the broader Exception e. How should this be done properly? –  James Poulson Oct 31 '11 at 2:07
1  
@James, I just observed that the message goes away if adding "throws XxxException" in function declaration. –  shiouming Oct 13 '12 at 10:58
2  
In Java 7 compiler for such rethrow is more inteligent. Now it works fine with specific "throws" exceptions in containing method. –  Waldemar Wosiński Jan 29 '13 at 16:18
38  
@James If you catch(Exception e) { throw e; } that will be unhandled. If you catch(InterruptedException ie) { throw ie; } it will be handled. As a rule of thumb, don't catch(Exception e) - this isn't pokemon, and we don't want to catch 'em all! –  corsiKa Jun 10 '13 at 19:24
3  
Like the pokemon analogy. Thanks :) –  James Poulson Jun 14 '13 at 5:21

I would prefer:

try
{
   ...
}
catch (FooException fe){
   throw fe;
}
catch (Exception e)
{
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Definitely proper in Java to catch specific exceptions than generic and checking for instance of. +1 –  amischiefr Jul 8 '09 at 12:21
2  
This pattern works well for RuntimeExceptions. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jul 8 '09 at 13:03
    
And lets hope FooException is unchecked or is declared in the enclosing method's throws part. C# exceptions are unchecked and can be re-thrown freely –  kd304 Jul 8 '09 at 13:19
1  
-1 because you should never catch plain "Exception" unless you know what you're doing. –  Stroboskop Jul 29 '09 at 9:50
8  
@Stroboskop: true, but to answer it's best to use the same (similar) code as in the question! –  Carlos Heuberger Jul 29 '09 at 11:18

You can also wrap the exception in another one AND keep the original stack trace by passing in the Exception as a Throwable as the cause parameter:

try
{
   ...
}
catch (Exception e)
{
     throw new YourOwnException(e);
}
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1  
This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  drxzcl Aug 28 '12 at 8:45

In Java is almost the same:

try
{
   ...
}
catch (Exception e)
{
   if (e instanceof FooException)
     throw e;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't it change/lose the original stack trace? –  ripper234 Jul 8 '09 at 11:45
3  
No, as long as you do not instantiate a new Exception-object the stacktrace stays the same. –  Mnementh Jul 8 '09 at 11:47
7  
I would add a specific catch for FooException –  dfa Jul 8 '09 at 11:49
1  
In this specific case I agree, but adding a specific catch may not be the right choice - imagine you have some common code for all exceptions and after, for a particular exception, rethrow it. –  alves Jul 8 '09 at 11:54
3  
@alves you should use finally instead of this instanceof command! –  Markus Lausberg Jul 8 '09 at 11:56

In Java, you just throw the exception you caught, so throw e rather than just throw. Java maintains the stack trace.

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something like this

try 
{
  ...
}
catch (FooException e) 
{
  throw e;
}
catch (Exception e)
{
  ...
}
share|improve this answer

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