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Can anyone please explain the following code completely?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int *a, *s, i;

    a = s = (int *) malloc(4 * sizeof(int));

    for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        *(a + i) = i * 10;
        printf(" %d ", *(a + i));
    }

    printf("\n");
    printf("%d\n", *s++);
    printf("%d\n", (*s)++);
    printf("%d\n", *s);
    printf("%d\n", *++s);
    printf("%d\n", ++*s);
    printf("\n");
    printf("%d\n", *a++);
    printf("%d\n", (*a)++);
    printf("%d\n", *a);
    printf("%d\n", *++a);
    printf("%d\n", ++*a);

    return 0;
}

output:

0 10 20 30
0
10
11
20
21

0 
11
12
21
22

1) How pointer 's' is printing the values, where *(a+i) only been assigned the values in for loop?

2) Where does the value go exactly and stored when *(a+i) is assigned?

3) What's the difference between *s++, (*s)++, *++s, ++*s ?

4) Why the values are incremented by 1 when i print the pointer a similar to s?

Thanks in Advance ! :)

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closed as not a real question by Jens Gustedt, Richard Harrison, dgw, Luksprog, Matt Jun 11 '12 at 12:32

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Needs homework tag ? –  Paul R Jun 11 '12 at 6:40
1  
Please search the site before asking. There are a lot of questions already with basically the same question. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 11 '12 at 7:40
    
these are important questions and shouldn't be voted down imo –  mike fisher Jun 17 '12 at 14:17

4 Answers 4

1 and 2) Pointer points to (or you can say it is an address of) certain memory location. Since you assign a = s = (int*) malloc(4 * sizeof(int));, a and s both has the same address, or points to the same memory location. If anything changes to the content at the memory location (e.g. in your code, you are assigning numbers to the allocated memory), then as long as you have the right address (both a and s points to the same location), you can see the content changes.

A rough analogy is that, you ask for a house (malloc), and it gives you back the address of the house (a). Then you decide that the house is ugly, and you want to re-paint it (assign value: *(a + i) = i + 10), other people who you told the address to (s) will see that your house has been repainted.

3)

*s++ means access the content at the current address, and later increments the pointer (address).

Reflect back to your code, it accesses the first element, then the address will point to the second element.

(*s)++ means access the content at the current address, and later increments the content at the current address.

Reflect back to your code, it gets the content of the second element before incrementing it. The next print statement shows the content of the second element having been incremented.

*++s means increments the current address, and access the content at the incremented address.

Reflect back to your code, it gets the content of the third element.

++*s means increments the content at the current address, and access the incremented content.

Reflect back to your code, it gets the incremented content of the third element.

4) As explained in earlier part, if you modify the content via one pointer, you will see it if you have the same pointer (address). You are actually modifying the content of the memory addresses (as explained in 3), so you may see the effect of modification when you repeat the process.

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You need to study pointers first. May be this can help: http://www.cs.cf.ac.uk/Dave/C/node10.html

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1)

The variable a and s are pointing to the same memory location.

2)

if you say a + 1, you increment the value of pointer a by 1 times the size of its type (1*4). So if you say *(a+1), you take the value from the next integer. You can think of your variable as a array, because it points to a memory location of size of 4 integers. You can also access the values like this: a[0], a[1], a[2] and a[3].

3)

*s++: You take the value of that pointer and after that statement, the pointer s is incremented by 4.

`(*s)++': You take the value of the pointer and then increment that value by 1.

*++s: You increment the pointer s by 4 and then take the value of it.

++*s: You take the value of the pointer s and increment it by 1.

4)

Since pointer s and pointer a are pointing to the same memory location, and you call *s++, the value of that memory location is increased by one.

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a=s= (int *) malloc(4*sizeof(int)); 

this statement allocate the memory to 's' ans the same memory is assigned to 'a' for example i wil tale the address assigned is 2000 usually it will be in hex just for understanding i will take decimal value. for(i=0;i<4;i++)

 {

  *(a+i)=i*10;

 printf(" %d ",*(a+i));

   }

when u do (a+i) the address is added with i.... a+0 = 2000(as per example) a+1 = 2004(next memory location) because a is int pointer it will increment by 4(size of int)

         +--------+---------+----------+---------+
         |0       |   10    |     20   |    30   |
         |        |         |          |         |
         +--------+---------+----------+---------+
 Address 2000     2004      2008       2012

*(a+i) wil give u content of the memory location only (a+i) or a wil give u the address as ur assigning s to a both have same value so now *s++ now s is 2000 *s is 0 and s++ take place for next use of s it will be in 2004 location so its 0 next ur *s is 10 and (*s)++ wil post increment 10 so its 11 next use

see the precedence and associativity to know how it compiles

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/126fe14k%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

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