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I'm working on a little Python script that is supposed to match a series of authors and I'm using the re-module for that. I came across something unexpected and I have been able to reduce it to the following very simple example:

>>> import re
>>> s = "$word1$, $word2$, $word3$, $word4$"
>>> word = r'\$(word\d)\$'
>>> m = re.match(word+'(?:, ' + word + r')*', s)
>>> m.groups()
('word1', 'word4')

So I'm defining a 'basic' regexp that matches the main parts of my input, with some recognizable features (in this case I used the $-signs) and than I try to match one word plus a possible additional list of words.

I'd have expected that m.groups() would've displayed:

>>> m.groups()
('word1', 'word2', 'word3', 'word4')

But apparently I'm doing something wrong. I'd like to know why this solution does not work and how to change it, such that I get the result I'm looking for. BTW, this is with Python 2.6.6 on a Linux machine, in case that matters.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Although you're re is matching every $word#$, the second capture group is continuously getting replaced by the last item matched.

Let's take a look at the debugger:

>>> expr = r"\$(word\d)\$(?:, \$(word\d)\$)*"
>>> c = re.compile(expr, re.DEBUG)
literal 36
subpattern 1
  literal 119
  literal 111
  literal 114
  literal 100
  in
    category category_digit
literal 36
max_repeat 0 65535
  subpattern None
    literal 44
    literal 32
    literal 36
    subpattern 2
      literal 119
      literal 111
      literal 114
      literal 100
      in
        category category_digit
    literal 36

As you can see, there are only 2 capture groups: subpattern 1 and subpattern 2. Every time another $word#$ is found, subpattern 2 gets overwritten.

As for a potential solution, I would recommend using re.findall() instead of re.match():

>>> s = "$word1$, $word2$, $word3$, $word4$"
>>> authors = re.findall(r"\$(\w+)\$", s)
>>> authors
['word1', 'word2', 'word3', 'word4']
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1  
Thanks for the recommendation and the additional explanation - the re.DEBUG is a new option to me; great to know about! –  Jakob van Bethlehem Jun 11 '12 at 8:38
1  
@JakobvanBethlehem you should also check out re.VERBOSE which lets you split apart your regular expression, add comments, etc and still compile it. Basically, write portions of your RE on each line, add comments with the customary # (and make sure to put it in triple quotes). Can make your REs a lot more readable when they are particularly complex. –  Jeff Tratner Jun 11 '12 at 21:59

There are only two capture groups in your regexp. Try re.findall(word, s) instead.

Repeated captures are supported by regex module.

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For the full-blown case I'm trying to handle, I'm really reluctant to go with findall - thanks for suggesting regex, maybe that's the way to go –  Jakob van Bethlehem Jun 11 '12 at 8:41

When you have optional or repeated capturing groups, as you do with:

(?:, \$(word\d)\$)*

The regex only has one place for returning the text captured in that group despite the fact that it matched 3 sections of your string, so it contains the last such substring.

To find all the substrings, you can use findall or tokenize the string on some other delimiter.

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Thank you for the suggestion - although in the full blown case I'm trying to handle I'm trying to prevent using findall (it actually matches small bits and pieces I don't want as well, it's the ordering of different other parts of the regexp that makes things work) maybe I can work around it in ways I haven't thought of yet –  Jakob van Bethlehem Jun 11 '12 at 8:44
    
Well, another solution is to capture the entire optional part in a capturing group, so you have \$(word\d)\$((?:, \$word\d\$)*). Your regex will then return two groups, the group 1 with the first word, group 2 with the remaining matches, on which you can then run findall or split. This ensures that the second string at least follows your given pattern. –  beerbajay Jun 11 '12 at 8:49
    
Thanks for thinking a bit about this - it is the same direction I was thinking about as well, so I guess I'll give that a try. –  Jakob van Bethlehem Jun 11 '12 at 8:52

You can avoid regex like this:

>>> s = "$word1$, $word2$, $word3$, $word4$"
>>> s.replace('$','').split()
['word1,', 'word2,', 'word3,', 'word4']

Using regex you can use findall() instead:

>>> re.findall(word, s)
['word1', 'word2', 'word3', 'word4']
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Thanks for looking at my question. I'm aware of all the issues you raise - I just can't use them in the full-blown case I'm trying to handle.. –  Jakob van Bethlehem Jun 11 '12 at 8:35

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