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I have a string, and I want to make sure that every letter in it is English. The other characters, I don't care.

  1. 34556#%42%$23$%^*&sdfsfr - valid
  2. 34556#%42%$23$%^*&בלה בלה - not valid

Can I do that with Linq? RegEx?

Thanks

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4  
So is "naïve" an English word for you? –  Joey Jun 11 '12 at 8:21
3  
what have you tried?..... –  Mitch Wheat Jun 11 '12 at 8:22
    
@Joey - no, Only a-z or A-Z –  SexyMF Jun 11 '12 at 8:22
    
@MitchWheat - I know only basic RegEx... –  SexyMF Jun 11 '12 at 8:22
    
That's not evident from your question, as you haven't posted any RegEx..... –  Mitch Wheat Jun 11 '12 at 8:23

3 Answers 3

One thing you can try is put the char you want in this regx

bool IsValid(string input) {     
  return !(Regex.IsMatch(@"[^A-Za-z0-9'\.&@:?!()$#^]", input)); 
}

char other than specfied in the regx string are get ignored i.e return false..

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Maybe you could use

using System.Linq;

...

static bool IsValid(string str)
{
  return str.All(c => c <= sbyte.MaxValue);
}

This considers all ASCII chars to be "valid" (even control characters). But punctuation and other special characters outside ASCII are not "valid". If str is null, an exception is thrown.

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You can define in a character class either all characters/character ranges/Unicode-properties/blocks you want to allow or you don't want to allow.

[abc] is a character class that allows a and b and c

[^abc] is a negated character class that matches everything but not a or b or c

Here in your case I would go this way, no need to define every character:

^[\P{L}A-Za-z]*$

Match from the start to the end of the string everything that is not a letter [^\p{L}] or A-Za-z.

\p{L} Is a Unicode property and matches everything that has the property letter. \P{L} is the negated version, everything that is not a letter.

Test code:

string[] StrInputNumber = { "34556#%42%$23$%^*&sdfsfr", "asdf!\"§$%&/()=?*+~#'", "34556#%42%$23$%^*&בלה בלה", "öäü!\"§$%&/()=?*+~#'" };
Regex ASCIILettersOnly = new Regex(@"^[\P{L}A-Za-z]*$");
foreach (String item in StrInputNumber) {

    if (ASCIILettersOnly.IsMatch(item)) {
        Console.WriteLine(item + " ==> Contains only ASCII letters");
    }
    else {
        Console.WriteLine(item + " ==> Contains non ASCII letters");

    }
}

Some more basic regex explanations: What absolutely every Programmer should know about regular expressions

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2  
[^\p{L}] is the same as \P{L}, by the way. You can then combine them into: ^[\P{L}A-Za-z]*$ –  Kobi Jun 11 '12 at 8:50
    
thanks for your simplification @Kobi, included it in my answer. –  stema Jun 11 '12 at 8:55

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