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I have to run a bit of code in the background every one second, the code will call a webservice which searches a database and returns a value to the application. My question is which method would be the most effective to do this? I have read up on Timers, Threads, AsyncTask and Services and each seem to have their pros and cons. Please can someone tell me which would be the best to use considering execution time and battery life.

Thanks

Update: I decided to use Aysnc task to run my code in the background while using a TimeTask to trigger the AsyncTask at regular intervals. This way the operation is destroyed when I leave that particular activity

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Frankly, 1 second seems too short for a webservice+database search. Have you measured the time between the initial call to the webservice and the response? I would give it a shot either with Handler or Service (depends if this background work should be stopped or not, while you application is finished). –  hovanessyan Jun 11 '12 at 8:50
    
Yes it will only be active when in a particular activity, outside that activity it should be deactivated –  Amanni Jun 11 '12 at 9:16
    
Than I think it would be wise to look @ Handler, because you can easily bind it to the Activity lifecycle. –  hovanessyan Jun 11 '12 at 9:30
    
what a horrible idea. Hit a webservice every second? You should instead look into push notifications for your application. blog.mediarain.com/2011/03/… –  Matt Wolfe Jun 17 '12 at 19:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You will have to create a new Thread so that the call don't lock up the device if the call takes longer than expected. The AsyncTask is an easy way to use multithreading, but it lacks the functionality of repeating tasks. I would say that you are best of either using a Timer or the newer ScheduledExecutorService. If you chose to use the Timer you create a TimerTask that you can hand it. The ScheduledExecutorService takes a Runnable instead.

You might want to wrap the thread in a Service (The Service does not provide a new Thread), but this is not always necessary depending on your needs.

As suggested in comment, you can also use the Handler.postDelayed(). Although you still need to create a new thread and then call Looper.prepare() on it:

  class LooperThread extends Thread {
      public Handler mHandler;

      public void run() {
          Looper.prepare();

          mHandler = new Handler() {
              public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
                  // process incoming messages here
              }
          };

          Looper.loop();
      }
  }

(Code from Looper docs)

Also; calls to a webservice every second seems way too frequent, especially if the user is on a slow connection or there are data that needs to be transferred, try to reduce the calls as much as possible.

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usage of handler.postDelayed(...) instead of Java's classic timer is suggested by android dev team. Also, i agree with you that calling a web service every 1 sec is hell of a battery consumption :D –  Gökhan Barış Aker Jun 11 '12 at 9:01
    
@GökhanBarışAker: Yes, but Handlers run on the thread that creates them (that must also have a Looper) so he would nevertheless have to create a new thread and then call Looper.prepare(). –  Jave Jun 11 '12 at 9:05
    
@GökhanBarışAker Added the Handler method in my post :) –  Jave Jun 11 '12 at 9:11
    
Maybe without creating a subclass of thread with looper functionality (Same as android.os.HandlerThread), simply adding "Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.myLooper());" and then firing "handler.postDelayed(new Runnable, long delayTime)" would be more simple (Also remember to fire it recursively at the end of Runnable's run()). The details explained in arcticle developer.android.com/resources/articles/timed-ui-updates.html –  Gökhan Barış Aker Jun 11 '12 at 9:26
    
I used something similar to this using a handler, timertask and async task. However I didn't user the Lopper.loop method –  Amanni Jun 11 '12 at 15:32

You should use the service to do the background operation but in your case you want to run code in 1 sec here is the example of service using handler it call in every 1 sec.

public class YourService extends Service {
private static final String TAG = "Your Service";
private final Handler handler = new Handler(){
    @Override
    public void handleMessage(Message msg) {

}
};
@Override
public IBinder onBind(Intent intent) {
    return null;
}

@Override
public void onCreate() {
//  Toast.makeText(this, "My Service Created", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
    Log.d(TAG, "onCreate");

}

@Override
public void onDestroy() {
    super.onDestroy();
//  Toast.makeText(this, "My Service Stopped", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
    handler.removeCallbacks(sendUpdatesToUI);   
}
 private Runnable sendUpdatesToUI = new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            /// Any thing you want to do put the code here like web service procees it will run in ever 1 second
            handler.postDelayed(this, 1000); // 1 seconds
        }
 };
@Override
public void onStart(Intent intent, int startid) {

    handler.removeCallbacks(sendUpdatesToUI);
    handler.postDelayed(sendUpdatesToUI, 1000);//1 second       
    Log.d(TAG, "onStart");
}

}

and service can't run every time android idle the service within 3 or 4 hr i suggested you to use the foreground service to use your process long running.

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The service can be started and stopped from within an activity? Also can it return a value to the application? –  Amanni Jun 11 '12 at 9:20
    
yes you can stopService(new Intent(context, yourService.class)); startService(new Intent(context, yourService.class)); –  Munish Kapoor Jun 11 '12 at 9:26
    
There are chances that UI can freeze if you go for service –  krisDrOid Jun 20 '12 at 10:33
    
no there is no chance UI can freeze but if your application use the high memory then there is chance of UI freeze.. –  Munish Kapoor Jun 20 '12 at 11:35

For operations like this I tend to use a Service component. for the task itself i use an AsyncTask which will wait a set time before it repeats itself (using a while loop).

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Sounds like an interesting way to do this but in this method is there anyway to return values to the application? –  Amanni Jun 11 '12 at 9:26
    
You should be able to call methods in the class you nest the task in. That way you can get data from the asynctask to your service component. and I get my data to my activity by using a broadcastreceiver –  Wottah Jun 11 '12 at 9:46

I think it's not only one solution, so it's up to you. You can try start thread with this run method:

private final int spleeptime = 1000;
public boolean running;

@Override
public void run() {
    while (running) {
        try {
            int waited = 0;
            while ((waited < spleeptime)) {
                sleep(100);
                waited += 100;
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        } finally {
            // your code here
        }
    }
}
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