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I want to write an enumeratee that just pushes one Input.El into the iteratee and then returns the remaining iteratee. I call it prepend, because it changes the stream by just prepending a value to it. Here is my try:

object Enumeratees {
  def prepend[T](toPrepend: T) = new Enumeratee[T, T] {
    def applyOn[A](inner: Iteratee[T, A]): Iteratee[T, Iteratee[T, A]] = {
      val prepended = Iteratee.flatten(inner.feed(Input.El(toPrepend)))
      Done(prepended, Input.Empty)
    }
  }
}

When I now call it via

Enumerator(1,2,3,4) |>> (Enumeratees.prepend(0)  &>> Iteratee.foreach[Int]{i=>println(i)})

it only prints the 0 which should be prepended. The other values from the enumerator are ignored. If I do also override the &> method of the enumeratee (transform method), I can get it working:

def prepend[T](toPrepend: T) = new Enumeratee[T, T] {
  def applyOn[A](inner: Iteratee[T, A]): Iteratee[T, Iteratee[T, A]] = {
    val prepended = Iteratee.flatten(inner.feed(Input.El(toPrepend)))
    Done(prepended, Input.Empty)
  }

  override def transform[A](inner: Iteratee[T,A]): Iteratee[T,A] =
    Iteratee.flatten(inner.feed(Input.El(toPrepend)))
}

But that's not a very clean way, because the applyOn method still is invalid. I think I mistakted the meaning of the applyOn method. In my opinion it should return an iteratee that returns the original iteratee and input is continued on the original iteratee then.

The transform method above should explain, what behaviour I want from my enumeratee. How can I achieve this behaviour by overwriting applyOn instead of transform?

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1  
Are you sure you are using &> and not &>> in you sample? transform is only called when &>> is used. –  Sadache Jun 11 '12 at 10:41
    
you're right. I tried both versions and both didn't work, but &>> should be correct. I edited the question accordingly. –  Heinzi Jun 11 '12 at 11:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Either you edit your prepend Enumeratee to be like the following:

object Enumeratees {
  def prepend[T](toPrepend: T) = new Enumeratee[T, T] {
    def applyOn[A](inner: Iteratee[T, A]): Iteratee[T, Iteratee[T, A]] = {
      val prepended = Iteratee.flatten(inner.feed(Input.El(toPrepend)))
      Enumeratee.passAlong[T](prepended)
    }
  }
}

Or you get the original Iteratee after applying the Enumeratee and the Enumerator to it, something like Scala: Getting original iteratee after applying enumeratee (example from play documentation doesn't compile)

&>> will end the inside iteratee when the outside is Done. This is the only way to be able to get Iteratee[EOuter,AInner] since Enumeratee are mostly about adapting.

share|improve this answer
    
The passAlong approach works. Thank you. Is there some documentation or explanation what passAlong does? I found nothing about it in the play ScalaDocs. –  Heinzi Jun 11 '12 at 15:43
    
It is an Enumeratee that does nothing but passing along input to the inner iteratee. You are right it is not documented (It was under Traversable). –  Sadache Jun 11 '12 at 18:03

What about

Enumerator(1,2,3,4) |>>
Iteratee.flatten( Enumerator(0) |>> Iteratee.foreach[Int]{i=>println(i)} )

or

Enumerator(1,2,3,4) |>> (Enumeratees.prepend2(0) &> Iteratee.foreach[Int]{i=>println(i)})
share|improve this answer
    
The first approach doesn't work, because I need the enumeratee object. This enumeratee will be combined with other enumeratees, before it's applied to different streams. Your second approach is the same as mine above which didn't work. –  Heinzi Jun 11 '12 at 11:09

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