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I'm trying to write a codec for Code page 437. My plan was to just pass the ASCII characters through and map the remaining 128 characters in a table, using the utf-16 value as key.

For some combined charaters (letters with dots, tildes etcetera), the character appears to occupy two QChars.

A test program that prints the utf-16 values for the arguments to the program:

#include <iostream>
#include <QString>

using namespace std;

void print(QString qs)
{
    for (QString::iterator it = qs.begin(); it != qs.end(); ++it)
        cout << hex << it->unicode() << " ";
    cout << "\n";
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    for (int i = 1; i < argc; i++)
        print(QString::fromStdString(argv[i]));
}

Some output:

$ ./utf16 Ç ü é
c3 87 
c3 bc 
c3 a9 

I had expected

c387
c3bc
c3a9

Tried the various normalizationsforms avaialable in QString but no one had fewer bytes than the default.

Since QChar is 2 bytes it should be able to hold the value of the characters above in one object. Why does the QString use two QChars? How can I fetch the combined unicode value?

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You know cout prints bytes at a time right? How many 2-byte characters did you print? –  rubenvb Jun 11 '12 at 10:03
    
@rubenvb qs.length() confirms that the string consists of two bytes. –  dannas Jun 11 '12 at 10:41
1  
If there's anyone else who needs to write a cp437 codec, there's a mapping on the unicode.org site. –  dannas Jun 11 '12 at 11:15
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. QString::fromStdString expects an ASCII string and doesn't do any decoding. Use fromLocal8Bit instead.

  2. Your expected output is wrong. For example, Ç is U+00C7, so you should expect C7, not the UTF-8 encoding of C3 87!

If you modify main() as below, you get the expected Unicode code points. For each character, the first line lists the local encoding (here: Utf-8), since fromStdString is essentially a no-op and passes everything straight. The second line lists the correctly decoded Unicode code point index.

$ ./utf16 Ç ü é
c3 87 
c7 
c3 bc 
fc 
c3 a9 
e9 
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    for (int i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
        print(QString::fromStdString(argv[i]));
        print(QString::fromLocal8Bit(argv[i]));
    }
}
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Ah. 1 was caused by a misconception where I somehow got the impression that (the docs are pretty clear) that QString would try to interpret the encoding. That's not really doable in a consistent way 2. I thought that QChar::unicode() returned the actual byte representation and not the code points. This solves my problem and takes me a small step further against unicode enlightment. I'll wait a while to see if anything useful comes up. (Some people tend to not click on solved questions). –  dannas Jun 11 '12 at 11:12
1  
What else do you want to know?? QString is internally UTF-16 based and it doesn't do any sort of encoding or decoding -- just imagine how bad it would be to have to deal with encoding every time you try to operate on the strings! –  Kuba Ober Jun 11 '12 at 11:31
1  
How do you expect QChar::unicode() to return "the actual byte representation"? There is no byte representation until you know the encoding. So, I ask, how would QChar divine the encoding you expect? QChar represents Unicode codepoints. Encoding is a different matter entirely, and is handled by QTextCodecs. –  Kuba Ober Jun 11 '12 at 11:34
1  
The link you have provided is not all that applicable to QString. Qt uses the locally selected 8 bit encoding by default (from $LANG on Unices), and that's it. If you deal with I/O (say, files) that are encoded differently, it's up to you to figure out what encoding to tell Qt to use when converting bytes to strings –  Kuba Ober Jun 11 '12 at 11:37
    
My thinking went something like: If we store the code points, then we have to do a lookup for each char when we want to print a string. That sounds expensive. And I don't recognize those code points (the original output from my test script). Perhaps I'm dealing with the raw byte representation. As for the performance, I guess 0(1) table lookup won't be too costly. Doing the actual I/O is an order of magnitude worse. –  dannas Jun 11 '12 at 11:43
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Just sidestep the problem. See QApplication in Unicode. QApplication::arguments is already UTF-16 encoded for you taking local conventions into account.

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