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I just wanted to know how to session variable work with IN clause using MySql. You guys have any idea about this please share me also helps are definitely appreciated....

Example when i was tried my self but seriously not success.....

Queries with session variables

SET @concat_var := (SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(player_id) FROM tableB where id = 1);
// result 88,89
SELECT @concat_var;
SELECT player_id FROM tableA WHERE player_id IN (@concat_var);

Query Output (not accurate)

player_id 
88

(Result required)

player_id 
88 
89   
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

FIND_IN_SET() is the answer of this question

SET @concat_var := (SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(player_id) FROM tableB where id = 1);
SELECT @concat_var;
SELECT player_id FROM tableA WHERE FIND_IN_SET(player_id,@concat_var);
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@concat_var contains the string '88,89'. Therefore:

SELECT player_id FROM tableA WHERE player_id IN (@concat_var);

is performing:

SELECT player_id FROM tableA WHERE player_id IN ('88,89');

Since player_id is an integer type, MySQL performs the query by comparing player_id and the string as floating point numbers:

SELECT player_id FROM tableA WHERE player_id IN (88.0);

Hence this is why you see the incorrect result that you report.

You should instead use a join:

SELECT player_id FROM tableA JOIN tableB USING (player_id) WHERE tableB.id = 1;
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What do you think about FIND_IN_SET() –  Query Master Jun 11 '12 at 11:24
    
@QueryMaster: You could use that here, but a join is more appropriate. –  eggyal Jun 11 '12 at 11:26

As far as I know , it is not possible (edit: Turns out @QueryMaster was able to show that it is actually possible, although using MySQL proprietary extensions) to do it the way you're trying to, because the value of @concat_var is actually a single string, so your last query is actually equivalent to SELECT player_id FROM tableA WHERE player_id IN ('88,89') (MySQL will forcefully cast '88,89' to a numeric context by by parsing the integer prefix of the string, hence 88).

However it should be possible to do the following:

SELECT player_id
FROM tableA
WHERE player_id IN (
    SELECT player_id
    FROM tableB
    WHERE id = 1
)

Or the almost equivalent (might perform better, as it doesn't involve a subquery):

SELECT player_id
FROM tableA
JOIN tableB USING (player_id)
WHERE tableB.id = 1
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1  
What do you think about FIND_IN_SET()..... –  Query Master Jun 11 '12 at 11:23
    
@QueryMaster Very good point. I didn't know about it. It'd work, although it's not standard SQL (my solution is), and happens to be exactly what the OP asks for. –  Romain Jun 12 '12 at 8:05

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