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I need to delete a directory containing some files. I am using the following code:

public static void delete(File f) {
  if (f.isDirectory()) {
    for (File c : f.listFiles()) {
      delete(c);
    }
  }
  f.setWritable(true);
  f.delete();
}

For some reason, some files inside the directory, and hence the directory does not get deleted. What could be the possible reasons for this behavior, and how can I solve this problem?

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They could be used and locked by another process, or yours. Or you may simply not have the rights. –  dystroy Jun 11 '12 at 10:27
    
problem solved ? –  Alpesh Prajapati Jun 11 '12 at 11:16
    
I invoked System.gc() as suggested in this thread, and it worked. –  missingfaktor Jun 11 '12 at 11:59

1 Answer 1

It could be that the file is open somewhere, assuming you have write permisions to the directory. Trying to delete a file which hasn't been properly closed is a common source of strange failures to delete. After the program exists you find that the file can be deleted.

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The file in question isn't likely open. Its grand-grand-parent is. But I don't know if that should be a problem. –  missingfaktor Jun 11 '12 at 12:00
    
I invoked System.gc() as suggested in this thread, and it worked. –  missingfaktor Jun 11 '12 at 12:00
    
This means there are some files which have been discarded without being closed. The solution is to make sure that a file is always closed in a finally block so it is even closed if an exception is thrown. Or use Java 7's ARM. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 11 '12 at 12:13
    
but no exceptions are being thrown. –  missingfaktor Jun 11 '12 at 12:16
    
In that case they are simply being discarded. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 11 '12 at 12:17

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