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I get the following error with the following code. I tried to figure out where the problem is over Google, but I didn't find anything helpful.

Compiling /home/tectu/projects/resources/chibios/ext/lcd/touchpad.c
In file included from /home/tectu/projects/resources/chibios/ext/lcd/touchpad.c:1:0:
/home/tectu/projects/resources/chibios/ext/lcd/touchpad.h:17:1: warning: useless type qualifier in empty declaration [enabled by default]

Here's the the code from line 12 to line 17 from touchpad.h:

volatile struct cal {
    float xm; 
    float ym; 
    float xn; 
    float yn; 
};

And here's how I use this struct inside touchpad.c:

static struct cal cal = { 
    1, 1, 0, 0  
};

Can anyone show me the light? :D

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5  
Volatile refers to objects. Your type definition does not define an object. Your struct cal cal ={1,1,0,0}; does define an object. You could put the volatile in front of it. –  wildplasser Jun 11 '12 at 10:28
4  
Side note: volatile is a very specific keyword and is widely misused. Make sure you really need it! See here –  Shahbaz Jun 11 '12 at 10:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't get an error, just a warning.

And that applies to how you declare your struct cal: it is not volatile by itself; the volatile only applies to a concrete variable definition.

So in static struct cal cal, your variable cal is just static, but not volatile.

In that sense, the volatile declaration is, as the warning says, useless.

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volatile as a qualifier can be applied to a particular instance of structure.
You are applying it to a type which is useless and the compiler correctly points it out.

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volatile qualifies a variable, not a type.

Doing:

static volatile struct cal {
    float xm; 
    float ym; 
    float xn; 
    float yn; 
} cal;

would be legal, as would:

struct cal {
    float xm; 
    float ym; 
    float xn; 
    float yn; 
};

static volatile struct cal cal;
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The volatile keyword makes sense with an object. Not a type definition.

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The volatile key work should be used with real variables not with type definition.

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You can't attach a volatile qualifier to a struct declaration.

But, contrary to the other answers, you can in fact use the volatile qualifier on types, but not on structs. If you use typedef, you can create a volatile type for a struct.

In the following example, Vol_struct is actually not volatile, as in the poster's question. But Vol_type will create volatile variables without further qualification:

/* -------------------------------------------------------------------- */
/* Declare some structs/types                                           */
/* -------------------------------------------------------------------- */

/* wrong: can't apply volatile qualifier to a struct
   gcc emits warning: useless type qualifier in empty declaration */
volatile struct Vol_struct
{
    int x;
};

/* effectively the same as Vol_struct */
struct Plain_struct
{
    int x;
};

/* you CAN apply volatile qualifier to a type using typedef */
typedef volatile struct
{
    int x;
} Vol_type;


/* -------------------------------------------------------------------- */
/* Declare some variables using the above types                         */
/* -------------------------------------------------------------------- */
struct Vol_struct g_vol_struct;                     /* NOT volatile */
struct Plain_struct g_plain_struct;                 /* not volatile */
volatile struct Plain_struct g_vol_plain_struct;    /* volatile */
Vol_type g_vol_type;                                /* volatile */
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